Beethoven — Symphony No.5 - Allegro Con Brio
Album: Herbert Von Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic
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9.1

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Total ratings: 2154
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Released: 1808
Length: 7:15
Plays (last 30 days): 0
(Instrumental)
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5th, 7th, 9th; how many of us could have done this with even total hearing...point being Beethoven was simply a genius!!! His pieces always take my breath away... 

kingart wrote:

I'm not sure, but I think Ludwig van was not quite deaf when he wrote the 5th. It has been said that the famous opening notes was the beating upon his door of the accelerating loss of hearing. He was deaf thereafter, on the 7th - 9th, the Missa Solemnis, and all else. His finest works of music were composed by a deaf man. Never fails to amaze and inspire me. 
 

 


 kingart wrote:

I'm not sure, but I think Ludwig van was not quite deaf when he wrote the 5th. It has been said that the famous opening notes was the beating upon his door of the accelerating loss of hearing. He was deaf thereafter, on the 7th - 9th, the Missa Solemnis, and all else. His finest works of music were composed by a deaf man. Never fails to amaze and inspire me. 
 

 


Nothing like a little Ludwig in the morning...followed by Jimi Hendrix!!! Love you Radio Paradise!{#Smile}
this Beethoven guy shows some pretty good potential. 
SRV opening for Beethoven...that's THAT'S a GREAT DOUBLE-BILL!
 Randy wrote:
No question, Beethoven was a genius.  He was deaf when composed the 5th.  Never gets old.   

 
I'm not sure, but I think Ludwig van was not quite deaf when he wrote the 5th. It has been said that the famous opening notes was the beating upon his door of the accelerating loss of hearing. He was deaf thereafter, on the 7th - 9th, the Missa Solemnis, and all else. His finest works of music were composed by a deaf man. Never fails to amaze and inspire me. 
 
 Randy wrote:
No question, Beethoven was a genius.  He was deaf when composed the 5th.  Never gets old.   

 
He was impaired while composing the 5th, but not completely deaf until the incredible 9th.
 flyboy50 wrote:

Every lover of rock and pop should give Carl Orff's  'Carmina Burana' a listen.



 
Yes indeed!!
And good grief, what has this guy put out lately? Resting on his laurels.
 

Kaw wrote:
It's obviously a good symphony, but I heared it too many times. For many people this symphony has become the body of classical music. You say classical music. They say paddaddapaaam! It has become sort of cheesy to my ears.

There is a lot more crazy good classical music out there... 

 


Every lover of rock and pop should give Carl Orff's  'Carmina Burana' a listen.


I just wonder...What IF this got slipped into the poppy FM station my 12 year-old daughter listens to? Would listeners even notice? I like to think they would have a moment of pre-teen clarity. Just wondering. REGARDLESS of that silly thought as well as how many times I've heard it: Thank you Bill, for playing this. Now on to Jimi Hendrix. Got it!
No question, Beethoven was a genius.  He was deaf when composed the 5th.  Never gets old.   
 On_The_Beach wrote:

So you're essentially calling this the "Stairway to Heaven" of classical music?  {#Wink}

 
Exactly!
 Kaw wrote:
It's obviously a good symphony, but I heared it too many times. For many people this symphony has become the body of classical music. You say classical music. They say paddaddapaaam! It has become sort of cheesy to my ears.

There is a lot more crazy good classical music out there...
 
So you're essentially calling this the "Stairway to Heaven" of classical music?  {#Wink}
It's obviously a good symphony, but I heared it too many times. For many people this symphony has become the body of classical music. You say classical music. They say paddaddapaaam! It has become sort of cheesy to my ears.

There is a lot more crazy good classical music out there... 
speakers wobbling {#Dancingbanana}
SOOOOOOOOOI GOOD on a sunning morning drinking coffee. SO loud. SO good

{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}{#Boohoo}


 steeler wrote:
How does one rate this as sucko-barfo? 28 did.

  28 people with a very narrow perspective on music


 SuperWeh wrote:
not my thing. also not into the whole "i know something about music because i listen to classical music sometimes" thing. still, a whole lot better than anything mozart put out.

 
Agree re, Mozart. Disagree re, "i know something about music because i listen to classical music sometimes". I don't care if I am classified as a musical pleb. I know what I like and I like Beethoven, Verdi, Vivaldi, Saint-Saens, Borodin and so on.
Also like Van Halen, Rolling Stones, Garth Brooks, CSNY, Dire Straits and so on.
Great to 'know' music (my son the cellist gives me an education in this respect). Much prefer to tune in and decide "yes, it is good" (as in Vivaldi or Van Halen) or "no, it is drivel" (why am I thinking U2 right now).
 Pedro1874 wrote:

{#Notworthy}{#Clap}{#Sunny} This is why we love RP.  Stevie Ray segued into Ludwig Van.  {#Yes}

 
Followed by Jimi. RP - by far the best
 Typesbad wrote:
Most famous riff of all time?

  That or Eine Kleine Nachtmusik


 msymmes wrote:
And to follow Stevie Ray Vaughan's version of Pipeline is something you won't here anywhere else {#Bananajam}{#Bananajumprope}

 
{#Notworthy}{#Clap}{#Sunny} This is why we love RP.  Stevie Ray segued into Ludwig Van.  {#Yes}
OH BILL, YOU ECLECTIC DEVIL.
Simply superb!!
Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No3 would be the cherry on top.
 
It does not get much better than his 5th.  I don`t like Beethoven personally, but this is easily his best Symphony.
 
Karajan was just the bestes, and the Berlin philharmonic Orchestra is on top of their game in this recording. Love it.
Beethoven then Hendrix, only on RP. This is why RP is the best streaming music source on the planet. Considering how many people worldwide tune in, they must agree.{#Daisy}
Play the 8th, Bill! {#Boohoo}
Most famous riff of all time?
What is this, amateur hour? Who composed this tripe? A 3 years old?!
And to follow Stevie Ray Vaughan's version of Pipeline is something you won't here anywhere else {#Bananajam}{#Bananajumprope}
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Hmmm, so music can kick ass without electric guitars?
. . . interesting!

 
I hope your being sarcastic? {#Drunk} lol 
Just awesome to find this here. I love it!
 jenzen wrote:
What a sweet surprise to fine this Symphony — the whole symphony — as a selection on this Thursday afternoon. Like a summer storm with all its freshness and cooling rain. Then to follow with Eleanor Rigby? My friends and I think RP provides genius musical mixology. 

 
RP is a work of art that incorporates works of art.  In the case of Beethoven, a magnificent work of art!  And as I'm finishing up this comment, the Fifth is followed by Hendrix' All Along the Watchtower.  Classic.
 sid1950 wrote:

What meaning Beethoven intended by those notes is open to conjecture, but during WW2 the BBC used the 4-note motif (played on drums) to open their news broadcasts, and I believe Churchill was a great fan of the work.

Morse didn't begin work on what became International Morse Code until 1836, so the symphony pre-dates the code by 3 decades. So what came first? It may be that Morse knew the music?

 
A few years back, the BBC offered temporarily free downloads of the BBC Orchestra performing Beethoven's symphonies, with short commentary preceding the performances. The announcer for the 5th claimed that the opening notes were likely inspired by the call of the yellowhammer bird that Beethoven heard while walking through Vienna's Prater Park. 

A recording of the yellowhammer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnvc-Cc3vkU 

According to Wikipedia, the yellowhammer's hold over Beethoven showed up in other works: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowhammer#In_culture 
Hmmm, so music can kick ass without electric guitars?
. . . interesting!
 sid1950 wrote:

What meaning Beethoven intended by those notes is open to conjecture, but during WW2 the BBC used the 4-note motif (played on drums) to open their news broadcasts, and I believe Churchill was a great fan of the work.

Morse didn't begin work on what became International Morse Code until 1836, so the symphony pre-dates the code by 3 decades. So what came first? It may be that Morse knew the music?

 
Without a doubt, Samuel Morse had Beethoven's 5th Symphony in mind for the letter V. It would be too coincidental otherwise. None of this diminishes the magnificence of the this Symphony.
 Homunculus wrote:
It is interesting, even if only to myself, that Beethoven’s “dit dit dit dah” is Morse Code for the letter V that in Roman Numerals indicates number five. Certainly I’m not the only old code reading fossil listening to RP to have understood this.

 
What meaning Beethoven intended by those notes is open to conjecture, but during WW2 the BBC used the 4-note motif (played on drums) to open their news broadcasts, and I believe Churchill was a great fan of the work.

Morse didn't begin work on what became International Morse Code until 1836, so the symphony pre-dates the code by 3 decades. So what came first? It may be that Morse knew the music?
 Homunculus wrote:
It is interesting, even if only to myself, that Beethoven’s “dit dit dit dah” is Morse Code for the letter V that in Roman Numerals indicates number five. Certainly I’m not the only old code reading fossil listening to RP to have understood this.

 
An opinion without 3.142 is an onion.
You will understand.
{#Smile}

...some of these instrumental, orchestral, covers of classic rock songs really seem to work, but,
etc, etc, (you geddit !)

not my thing. also not into the whole "i know something about music because i listen to classical music sometimes" thing. still, a whole lot better than anything mozart put out.
Morse code was developed between 1835 and 1837. Beethoven's work is of 1808.
Maybe Morse took inspiration from Beethoven :-)

 
Homunculus wrote:
It is interesting, even if only to myself, that Beethoven’s “dit dit dit dah” is Morse Code for the letter V that in Roman Numerals indicates number five. Certainly I’m not the only old code reading fossil listening to RP to have understood this.

 

It is interesting, even if only to myself, that Beethoven’s “dit dit dit dah” is Morse Code for the letter V that in Roman Numerals indicates number five. Certainly I’m not the only old code reading fossil listening to RP to have understood this.
 PixelPushers wrote:
I think this comment was meant for the Clapton song that usually follows this classical piece. I'm pretty sure there are no saxophone solos in Beethoven's work. 
 

skyguy wrote:

Sax-a-ma-phone.....
 
 
https://youtu.be/YrwOxpac0XY

couldn't get it to embed.
I think this comment was meant for the Clapton song that usually follows this classical piece. I'm pretty sure there are no saxophone solos in Beethoven's work. 
 

skyguy wrote:

Sax-a-ma-phone.....
 

This guy Beethoven has a real future in music.

Wasn't he in one of those early boy groups back in the day. 
How does one rate this as sucko-barfo? 28 did.

Sax-a-ma-phone.....

 gumby wrote:

Remember Tom&Jerry?

 
Bugs was my introduction to Classical music. For that, I am grateful.
 clelaed wrote:
Remember Bugs Bunn y?

 
Remember Tom&Jerry?
From SRV to LVB.  ONLY on RP - Thanks Bill and Rebecca {#Clap}
 marktberry wrote:
"Nothing like a little Ludwig Van, oh, my droogies."

 
Thank God for Clockwork Orange....gave me a huge kickstart in appreciation of classical music