Elbow — Magnificent (She Says)
Album: Little Fictions
Avg rating:
7.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 928
Ratings histogram:
Released: 2017
Length: 4:22
Plays (last 30 days): 6
This is where, this is where the bottle lands
Where all the biggest questions meet
With little feet stood in the sand

This is where the echoes swell to nothing on the tide
And where a tiny pair of hands
Finds a sea-worn piece of glass
And sets it as a sapphire in her mind

And there she stands
Throwing both her arms around the world
The world that doesn't even know
How much it needs this little girl

It's all gonna be magnificent, she says
It's all gonna be magnificent

This is where it all began
To light your mother's cigarette
And I got to touch her hand
And my heart, there defrosting in a gaze
Wasn't built to be that way
Suddenly I understand

There on the sand
Throwing both her arms around the world
The world that doesn't even know
How much it needs this little girl

It's all gonna be magnificent, she says
It's all gonna be magnificent
It's all gonna be magnificent, she says
It's all gonna be magnificent

The echoes slow, the bottle lands
The echoes slow, and there she stands
Comments (56)add comment
 expatlar wrote:
Stop saying that. No it's not.

 
I was hearing 'It's all going to be like a movie set' before I noted the song title.  Seems more likely....
Stop saying that. No it's not.
{#Clap}

Live Music is Better, Bumper Stickers Should Be issued.

They are indeed a very good live band....
{#Clap}
  ayohn wrote:
Saw them 11/3 at the 9:30 in DC...phenomenal concert, casual, entertaining, great sound, and full on audience participation!  Overall great live show!  (This was the second song played.)

Sometimes, it is wonderful to understand the effect music and good live shows have on a person...

===================================

Distinguished New Communication Major Acceptance Speech

Erika Yohn

I can remember my first time at a concert. ....

... I will create the unforgettable night for someone else.


====================

(Read full below in comments)
 
And this, folks, is what these boards are for.  The love of the music and appreciation of the music.  Sharing positive experiences with the music.  Thanks ayohn!
 ayohn wrote:
Saw them 11/3 at the 9:30 in DC...phenomenal concert, casual, entertaining, great sound, and full on audience participation!  Overall great live show!  (This was the second song played.)

Sometimes, it is wonderful to understand the effect music and good live shows have on a person...

===================================

Distinguished New Communication Major Acceptance Speech

Erika Yohn

I can remember my first time at a concert.

My dad is an avid music junkie, and bombarded my tiny little ears with 80s rock, 90s British underground, and the like since before I could walk. So, naturally, he took me to an Elbow concert. Elbow is a British band of 40-year-old men that was (and still is) pretty popular across the ocean. As a 14-year-old, I was the youngest one in the club. It was a Tuesday night in Washington D.C., three hours from home. Not the prime place for me to be during my bedtime on a school night.

But it was a night I will never forget.

I sang my tiny lungs out, knowing every word by heart. I even wore shoes I colored in the spirit of the band (I still wear them to every concert to this day). The most magical part of the night was when they played my favorite song of all time. My dad had a bruise from the excited pushing and squeezing he endured when I heard the first notes.

I cried a little, I will admit. It was such a pivotal night in my life, and in more ways than I

thought at the time. I kept thinking to myself, like most young kids, wanted to be on stage.

I wanted to give others the same experience. I wanted to be the reason someone buys show tickets months in advance and keeps a countdown calendar like I did.

But I had one slight issue. I could not sing, or play an instrument well enough. And honestly, I had little motivation to learn. 

Music still had a hold on me, though. I realized that there is so much more that goes into making someone's favorite song. There is more than just the instruments or singers. There are sound engineers, and record labels, and producers.

That is what I wanted. I wanted a hand in making the music, without overpowering  the initial creativity of the songwriter. I wanted to be a maker and a listener. And I decided I was going to be a producer.

Throughout high school, I did as much as was possible to learn what was needed to pursue my dream. I did a sound engineering and production workshop, and went to more concerts than I can count. I fell in love with the technology and software in the studio. I found my niche.

College is just a steppingstone to more opportunity. And learning the ins and outs of a multitude of media industries now gives me the chance to bring ingenuity to the table in the future. I finally get to spend time learning about exactly what I love. And to me, that is the greatest part about studying communication. 

I love what I am studying, and the material just ignites my passions further. Degree in hand, I will get to fulfill the original dream of sharing the experience of music with others. The little girl screaming in the crowd will not be me anymore, but someone else. And I will be the one responsible for the favorite song, for the bruises on Dad's shoulder.

I will create the unforgettable night for someone else.

====================

 
Wow, that is a nice piece of writing that really resonated with me. Thanks for sharing!
 ayohn wrote:
Saw them 11/3 at the 9:30 in DC...phenomenal concert, casual, entertaining, great sound, and full on audience participation!  Overall great live show!  (This was the second song played.)

Sometimes, it is wonderful to understand the effect music and good live shows have on a person...

===================================

Distinguished New Communication Major Acceptance Speech

Erika Yohn

I can remember my first time at a concert.

My dad is an avid music junkie, and bombarded my tiny little ears with 80s rock, 90s British underground, and the like since before I could walk. So, naturally, he took me to an Elbow concert. Elbow is a British band of 40-year-old men that was (and still is) pretty popular across the ocean. As a 14-year-old, I was the youngest one in the club. It was a Tuesday night in Washington D.C., three hours from home. Not the prime place for me to be during my bedtime on a school night.

But it was a night I will never forget.

I sang my tiny lungs out, knowing every word by heart. I even wore shoes I colored in the spirit of the band (I still wear them to every concert to this day). The most magical part of the night was when they played my favorite song of all time. My dad had a bruise from the excited pushing and squeezing he endured when I heard the first notes.

I cried a little, I will admit. It was such a pivotal night in my life, and in more ways than I

thought at the time. I kept thinking to myself, like most young kids, wanted to be on stage.

I wanted to give others the same experience. I wanted to be the reason someone buys show tickets months in advance and keeps a countdown calendar like I did.

But I had one slight issue. I could not sing, or play an instrument well enough. And honestly, I had little motivation to learn. 

Music still had a hold on me, though. I realized that there is so much more that goes into making someone's favorite song. There is more than just the instruments or singers. There are sound engineers, and record labels, and producers.

That is what I wanted. I wanted a hand in making the music, without overpowering  the initial creativity of the songwriter. I wanted to be a maker and a listener. And I decided I was going to be a producer.

Throughout high school, I did as much as was possible to learn what was needed to pursue my dream. I did a sound engineering and production workshop, and went to more concerts than I can count. I fell in love with the technology and software in the studio. I found my niche.

College is just a steppingstone to more opportunity. And learning the ins and outs of a multitude of media industries now gives me the chance to bring ingenuity to the table in the future. I finally get to spend time learning about exactly what I love. And to me, that is the greatest part about studying communication. 

I love what I am studying, and the material just ignites my passions further. Degree in hand, I will get to fulfill the original dream of sharing the experience of music with others. The little girl screaming in the crowd will not be me anymore, but someone else. And I will be the one responsible for the favorite song, for the bruises on Dad's shoulder.

I will create the unforgettable night for someone else.

====================

 
Thank you for sharing this... My eldest daughter has really latched on to a lot of my music. It's such a wonderful experience to be able to share closely with one's offspring. She absolutely loves Elbow and in particular, Little Fictions.
Their show at a small Portland venue was magnificent as well. A very engaging and interactive performance, if you like that sort of thing. 
Something about this song really grabs me. It's one of my favorite tracks of 2017, and it's a 9 for me.
Magnifique !!!!
Saw them 11/3 at the 9:30 in DC...phenomenal concert, casual, entertaining, great sound, and full on audience participation!  Overall great live show!  (This was the second song played.)

Sometimes, it is wonderful to understand the effect music and good live shows have on a person...

===================================

Distinguished New Communication Major Acceptance Speech

Erika Yohn

I can remember my first time at a concert.

My dad is an avid music junkie, and bombarded my tiny little ears with 80s rock, 90s British underground, and the like since before I could walk. So, naturally, he took me to an Elbow concert. Elbow is a British band of 40-year-old men that was (and still is) pretty popular across the ocean. As a 14-year-old, I was the youngest one in the club. It was a Tuesday night in Washington D.C., three hours from home. Not the prime place for me to be during my bedtime on a school night.

But it was a night I will never forget.

I sang my tiny lungs out, knowing every word by heart. I even wore shoes I colored in the spirit of the band (I still wear them to every concert to this day). The most magical part of the night was when they played my favorite song of all time. My dad had a bruise from the excited pushing and squeezing he endured when I heard the first notes.

I cried a little, I will admit. It was such a pivotal night in my life, and in more ways than I

thought at the time. I kept thinking to myself, like most young kids, wanted to be on stage.

I wanted to give others the same experience. I wanted to be the reason someone buys show tickets months in advance and keeps a countdown calendar like I did.

But I had one slight issue. I could not sing, or play an instrument well enough. And honestly, I had little motivation to learn. 

Music still had a hold on me, though. I realized that there is so much more that goes into making someone's favorite song. There is more than just the instruments or singers. There are sound engineers, and record labels, and producers.

That is what I wanted. I wanted a hand in making the music, without overpowering  the initial creativity of the songwriter. I wanted to be a maker and a listener. And I decided I was going to be a producer.

Throughout high school, I did as much as was possible to learn what was needed to pursue my dream. I did a sound engineering and production workshop, and went to more concerts than I can count. I fell in love with the technology and software in the studio. I found my niche.

College is just a steppingstone to more opportunity. And learning the ins and outs of a multitude of media industries now gives me the chance to bring ingenuity to the table in the future. I finally get to spend time learning about exactly what I love. And to me, that is the greatest part about studying communication. 

I love what I am studying, and the material just ignites my passions further. Degree in hand, I will get to fulfill the original dream of sharing the experience of music with others. The little girl screaming in the crowd will not be me anymore, but someone else. And I will be the one responsible for the favorite song, for the bruises on Dad's shoulder.

I will create the unforgettable night for someone else.

====================

 maxjboxer wrote:
Thanks for introducing me to Elbow.  4 or 5 years ago my son's friend in collage said he had this cool new band's record and my son said yeah my dad likes them. lol

 
I had a similar small triumph: I came into the kitchen a couple years ago and heard my then preteen daughter listening to "Mirror Ball." She'd added it to her ITunes list.  

Nov. 6th I'm going to their concert in Oakland.  Can't wait
God they are dreadful. 
Quickly becoming my fav Elbow tune. A uniquely tuneful and thoughtful piece. 
Modern classics.  I love a bit of Elbow.
Thanks for introducing me to Elbow.  4 or 5 years ago my son's friend in collage said he had this cool new band's record and my son said yeah my dad likes them. lol
Nice song.

'Tis interesting and amusing to see the spontaneous handwringing and hair-pulling about the new 'tiny hands' president back in January 2017.

Still a nice song. 
8
 fredriley wrote:

How the feck did US-centric political comment appear in the board for a song by a Yorkshire band? I've scrolled down and can't see where the thread started, and what justification it has (or, more likely, doesn't have). Neither is the song content in any degree political.

I'm no stranger to political rants, but there's a time and a place, bags*.

* boys and girls (after Iain M Banks)

 
It started (mildly) with the sixth post up from the bottom, then took on a more noxious aspect on the next post.  After that it quickly festered into something that should've been excised with a heated scalpel.  Anyhow, cool tune.
 SmackDaddy wrote:

The problem with an assassination of Trump is that it would feed the beast that is his support. They'd get to rightfully claim the violence of the left as the true enemy of the country and would feel very empowered. We already are dealing with 40% of the population that live their lives in fear and they don't know it. They live in fear of their god, in fear of change, in fear of outsiders, in fear of science, in fear of knowledge, and in fear of the future. It's been scientifically shown that the fear center of the brain is larger in conservatives while the part of the brain that controls empathy is larger in liberals. It explains a lot.

 
How the feck did US-centric political comment appear in the board for a song by a Yorkshire band? I've scrolled down and can't see where the thread started, and what justification it has (or, more likely, doesn't have). Neither is the song content in any degree political.

I'm no stranger to political rants, but there's a time and a place, bags*.

* boys and girls (after Iain M Banks)
 ericeobrien wrote:

It's not "political" to wish for the assassination of a President—it's violent. I abhor most all of President Trump's campaign rhetoric, cabinet appointments, tweets, and executive orders, but I more highly value the processes of free elections and advocacy / dissent.  These power systems MUST be based on speech and nonviolent action. If we start advocating for regime change through either private or military violence, representative democracy is over.

 
The problem with an assassination of Trump is that it would feed the beast that is his support. They'd get to rightfully claim the violence of the left as the true enemy of the country and would feel very empowered. We already are dealing with 40% of the population that live their lives in fear and they don't know it. They live in fear of their god, in fear of change, in fear of outsiders, in fear of science, in fear of knowledge, and in fear of the future. It's been scientifically shown that the fear center of the brain is larger in conservatives while the part of the brain that controls empathy is larger in liberals. It explains a lot.
Awesome BillG! Thanks for resolving the preceding 'sadness' (impending death and divorce) this beautiful gem.
 AbileneTexas wrote:
Very nice tune.  Bumped from 7 to 8 with this listen. 

 
Likewise, I just bumped all the way to 10, I find myself humming this all day, damn ear worms!
 Dave_Mack wrote:
These guys are still doing good stuff! I'll have to pick up the album.

 
Also, Build a Rocket Boys is worth having.
These guys are still doing good stuff! I'll have to pick up the album.
Very nice tune.  Bumped from 7 to 8 with this listen. 
I'm liking this!  Thanks for the new Elbow!
I'm liking Elbow more with every listening, esp. this magnificent track. Thanks as always to BillG for sharing his eclecticism with us listeners. 

I wonder if BillG would ever have any events where listeners can request tracks/sets/albums/etc., either as contests or even as a spontaneous "thank you" for donating.  I think we'd all enjoy occasionally having slightly different programming offered.  If not, I fir one continue to enjoy NOT having stupid FM ads constantly blaring between tired over-played songs.
 Proclivities wrote:
Cool tune.  The rhythm section is especially engaging on this number.

 
They lost the drummer, so I think it's all programming. Annoys me, throughout the album.
 ShamanManu wrote:
liking it more and more with each new listening... magnificently uplifting {#Good-vibes}

 
I second that emotion!
 Proclivities wrote:
Cool tune.  The rhythm section is especially engaging on this number.

 
I totally agree. 9

Those corporations are just so naughty!

Hedges and Sacco remind me of the endless blather I used to hear from the Marxists in college. Long on slogans and short on facts.

 

 

Michael_Dean wrote:

Mister Kingart, representative democracy died 20 years ago.  I'd like to hear some sad music in the time between these paragraphs.  The Slow Show - God Only Knows is pretty good here. 

In Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt by Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco, inverted totalitarianism is described as a system where corporations have corrupted and subverted democracy and where economics trumps politics.  In inverted totalitarianism, every natural resource and every living being is commodified and exploited to collapse as the citizenry is lulled and manipulated into surrendering their liberties and their participation in government through excess consumerism and sensationalism.

Inverted totalitarianism - unlike classical totalitarianism, does not find it's expression through a demagogue or a charismatic leader, but through the anonymity of the corporate state.  A system by which corporate forces purport to pay loyalty to the constitution, electoral politics, the iconography  and language of American patriotism, and yet have so corrupted the levers of power as to have rendered the citizenry powerless.



 


Mister Kingart, representative democracy died 20 years ago.  I'd like to hear some sad music in the time between these paragraphs.  The Slow Show - God Only Knows is pretty good here. 

In Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt by Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco, inverted totalitarianism is described as a system where corporations have corrupted and subverted democracy and where economics trumps politics.  In inverted totalitarianism, every natural resource and every living being is commodified and exploited to collapse as the citizenry is lulled and manipulated into surrendering their liberties and their participation in government through excess consumerism and sensationalism.

Inverted totalitarianism - unlike classical totalitarianism, does not find it's expression through a demagogue or a charismatic leader, but through the anonymity of the corporate state.  A system by which corporate forces purport to pay loyalty to the constitution, electoral politics, the iconography  and language of American patriotism, and yet have so corrupted the levers of power as to have rendered the citizenry powerless.


 

If one does "highly value the processes of free elections and advocacy / dissent" then one needs to grant that people who voted another way did so for good and valid reasons. That is the bargain we accede to in a functioning representative republic. It doesn't take much of a study of history to see what happens when that bargain is not accepted.

Great tune though, liking this new album.

 

kingart wrote:

Aside from the black hole-size gap in the knowledge we have of Oswald's total, true complicity in that abhorent act (or the "official stories" vs. the more likely facts about any of the other such events in our history, for that matter, i.e., CIA, FBI), we must always believe that the angry but benevolent awakening of good-willed people can and will correct this imbalance. This was no fluke or accident. It was years in the making.  In a number of collusive ways and means, "they" have been working for years to degrade—but have not yet deprived—our voice and action, and they have succeeded. But only for now.  
"They" have fooled just enough people just enough times and have come to believe they can continue to dupe us into stupor. They are the ultimate subversives, and thrive on despair, confusion and fear. Mr. T. loves fear. All cowards crave the fear of their adversaries.
However, don't be fearful. Be informed. Inform others. Rise Up.  Take Names. Kick Ass. Clean House. Get Even. 
Der Trumper has already lost the consent of the governed. He could well take his party with him. "They" got what they wished for, but already, they don't what the hell to do with it. As I said to someone recently, any relationship that begins in negativity is doomed to failure. But we don't need anyone to remove "them", when they are doing so much to remove themselves.  
I'm going to google up the Vegas odds that he won't be president after 2017. The numbers may surprise you. 
Not even God can help us in the next 4 years. Unless he decides to shorten the new dictatorship. Lee Harvey - where are you when we need you.

Sorry to get political. But I have never been more fearful for the future of my homeland.



  
It's not "political" to wish for the assassination of a President—it's violent. I abhor most all of President Trump's campaign rhetoric, cabinet appointments, tweets, and executive orders, but I more highly value the processes of free elections and advocacy / dissent.  These power systems MUST be based on speech and nonviolent action. If we start advocating for regime change through either private or military violence, representative democracy is over.

 


 Clarentine wrote:
This guy's voice is magnificent.  

 
YES!!
This guy's voice is magnificent.  
They did it again. Pure awesomeness
Cool tune.  The rhythm section is especially engaging on this number.
Yesssss was waiting for RP to play some tracks of their new album. I absolutely love it! This track is also featured in a short clip about climate change where some well known actors including Charles Dance recite a poem. It's pretty amazing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zD3YxrZdyzo&ab_channel=TheClimateCoalition 
liking it more and more with each new listening... magnificently uplifting {#Good-vibes}

 My feelings exactly.

kingart wrote:

Aside from the black hole-size gap in the knowledge we have of Oswald's total, true complicity in that abhorent act (or the "official stories" vs. the more likely facts about any of the other such events in our history, for that matter, i.e., CIA, FBI), we must always believe that the angry but benevolent awakening of good-willed people can and will correct this imbalance. This was no fluke or accident. It was years in the making.  In a number of collusive ways and means, "they" have been working for years to degrade—but have not yet deprived—our voice and action, and they have succeeded. But only for now.  
"They" have fooled just enough people just enough times and have come to believe they can continue to dupe us into stupor. They are the ultimate subversives, and thrive on despair, confusion and fear. Mr. T. loves fear. All cowards crave the fear of their adversaries.
However, don't be fearful. Be informed. Inform others. Rise Up.  Take Names. Kick Ass. Clean House. Get Even. 
Der Trumper has already lost the consent of the governed. He could well take his party with him. "They" got what they wished for, but already, they don't what the hell to do with it. As I said to someone recently, any relationship that begins in negativity is doomed to failure. But we don't need anyone to remove "them", when they are doing so much to remove themselves.  
I'm going to google up the Vegas odds that he won't be president after 2017. The numbers may surprise you. 
Not even God can help us in the next 4 years. Unless he decides to shorten the new dictatorship. Lee Harvey - where are you when we need you.

Sorry to get political. But I have never been more fearful for the future of my homeland.



  
It's not "political" to wish for the assassination of a President—it's violent. I abhor most all of President Trump's campaign rhetoric, cabinet appointments, tweets, and executive orders, but I more highly value the processes of free elections and advocacy / dissent.  These power systems MUST be based on speech and nonviolent action. If we start advocating for regime change through either private or military violence, representative democracy is over.

 


Aside from the black hole-size gap in the knowledge we have of Oswald's total, true complicity in that abhorent act (or the "official stories" vs. the more likely facts about any of the other such events in our history, for that matter, i.e., CIA, FBI), we must always believe that the angry but benevolent awakening of good-willed people can and will correct this imbalance. This was no fluke or accident. It was years in the making.  In a number of collusive ways and means, "they" have been working for years to degrade—but have not yet deprived—our voice and action, and they have succeeded. But only for now.  
"They" have fooled just enough people just enough times and have come to believe they can continue to dupe us into stupor. They are the ultimate subversives, and thrive on despair, confusion and fear. Mr. T. loves fear. All cowards crave the fear of their adversaries.
However, don't be fearful. Be informed. Inform others. Rise Up.  Take Names. Kick Ass. Clean House. Get Even. 
Der Trumper has already lost the consent of the governed. He could well take his party with him. "They" got what they wished for, but already, they don't what the hell to do with it. As I said to someone recently, any relationship that begins in negativity is doomed to failure. But we don't need anyone to remove "them", when they are doing so much to remove themselves.  
I'm going to google up the Vegas odds that he won't be president after 2017. The numbers may surprise you. 
Not even God can help us in the next 4 years. Unless he decides to shorten the new dictatorship. Lee Harvey - where are you when we need you.

Sorry to get political. But I have never been more fearful for the future of my homeland.



  
It's not "political" to wish for the assassination of a President—it's violent. I abhor most all of President Trump's campaign rhetoric, cabinet appointments, tweets, and executive orders, but I more highly value the processes of free elections and advocacy / dissent.  These power systems MUST be based on speech and nonviolent action. If we start advocating for regime change through either private or military violence, representative democracy is over.
That has happened to me multiple times.  I like this one a lot.

I just read an interview with Steve Hackett and he complimented Elbow as one of his favorite proggy bands now on the scene... 


ericeobrien wrote:
Everytime I hear Elbow before I know it's Elbow, I think for just a second, "is this a Peter Gabriel song that I don't know?"

 


11 plays in last 30 days... Ok Bill, you are starting to to burn this one out a bit. Liked it more when I heard it less. I've already heard about 3 or so Elbow songs already today. 
Everytime I hear Elbow before I know it's Elbow, I think for just a second, "is this a Peter Gabriel song that I don't know?"
 flyboy50 wrote:

Not even God can help us in the next 4 years. Unless he decides to shorten the new dictatorship. Lee Harvey - where are you when we need you.

Sorry to get political. But I have never been more fearful for the future of my homeland.



 
It's not "political" to wish for the assassination of a President—it's violent. I abhor most all of President Trump's campaign rhetoric, cabinet appointments, tweets, and executive orders, but I more highly value the processes of free elections and advocacy / dissent.  These power systems MUST be based on speech and nonviolent action. If we start advocating for regime change through either private or military violence, representative democracy is over.
 flyboy50 wrote:

Not even God can help us in the next 4 years. Unless he decides to shorten the new dictatorship. Lee Harvey - where are you when we need you.

Sorry to get political. But I have never been more fearful for the future of my homeland.



 
sick un-American thought, definitely not needed in this forum.
 VV wrote:
Staring to be overplayed. I think I heard this yesterday.

 
Well, I didn't. I wish I had. Because I like it. 
 
Staring to be overplayed. I think I heard this yesterday.
 wrangler wrote:

"very tiny hands".  appropriate lyric for inauguration day.  god help us all

{#Cowboy}



 
Not even God can help us in the next 4 years. Unless he decides to shorten the new dictatorship. Lee Harvey - where are you when we need you.

Sorry to get political. But I have never been more fearful for the future of my homeland.


"very tiny hands".  appropriate lyric for inauguration day.  god help us all

{#Cowboy}