Jason Isbell — White Man's World
Album: The Nashville Sound
Avg rating:
6.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 777









Released: 2017
Length: 3:50
Plays (last 30 days): 4
I'm a white man living in a white man's world
Under our roof is a baby girl
I thought this world could be hers one day
But her momma knew better

I'm a white man living in a white man's town
Want to take a shot of cocaine and burn it down
Momma wants to change that Nashville sound
But they're never gonna let her

There's no such thing as someone else's war
Your creature comforts aren't the only things worth fighting for
Still breathing, it's not too late
We're all carrying one big burden, sharing one fate

I'm a white man living on a white man's street
I've got the bones of the red man under my feet
The highway runs through their burial grounds
Past the oceans of cotton

I'm a white man looking in a black man's eyes
Wishing I'd never been one of the guys
Who pretended not to hear another white man's joke
Oh, the times ain't forgotten

There's no such thing as someone else's war
Your creature comforts aren't the only things worth fighting for
You're still breathing, it's not too late
We're all carrying one big burden, sharing one fate

I'm a white man living in a white man's nation
I think the man upstairs must'a took a vacation
I still have faith, but I don't know why
Maybe it's the fire in my little girl's eyes
Maybe it's the fire in my little girl's eyes
Comments (86)add comment
My only problem with the lyrics is my confusion by the phrase "take a shot of cocaine".

As a recovering coke head, I'm sure Isbell had his own slang, but a "shot"? Is he talking about cocaine at all or the drink "liquid cocaine"?

Sounds like Jason's got his old DBT slide tone back on this one...love it!
this is incredibly relevant..
Grate song, great message. 

And comments on songs like this help us see that there are still some closed minded Trumpers on here. 
What I like most about RP is that sometimes it makes me go back to a song to reread the lyrics.
Wonderful song and lyrics.  It is so important that each of us find within ourselves the ability to connect with our similarities among each other.  No one person's truth is more important than the next person's.  Great song.
So give it up Jason.   Find the nearest Indian and write them a check.  Their ancestors would laugh at you!
 fogmoose wrote:

Spoken like a true Mass-hole....

 
{#Roflol}{#Roflol}{#Roflol}{#Roflol}Ha! How true!! {#Roflol}{#Roflol}{#Roflol}{#Roflol}
Agreed


cc_rider wrote:

Well said. Thank you.
c.

 

Pseudo-snowflake. Pathetic.
Anger and guilt; a winning combination.

Gets extra points from me for those lyrics...

 MassivRuss wrote:
This song is everything wrong with America. White cracker self-pity, the force poisoning our democracy.

 
May the force be with you.
 greiffenstein wrote:

Agree with you, west.  You have to be deaf not to hear the guilt in the song.  And you have to be blind not to see that it's both warranted and past due.  I'm a white man, I don't have to give everything away and go hang myself, but being conscious of my privilege and the lack of the same privilege for others is the first step in figuring out how to resolve these injustices.  But don't listen to me.  Listen to the song.

 
Well said. Thank you.
c.
 MassivRuss wrote:
This song is everything wrong with America. White cracker self-pity, the force poisoning our democracy.

 
Spoken like a true Mass-hole....
 MassivRuss wrote:
All the wrong ways to comment on white privilege and white guilt.

 
What would be the right way, in your learned opinion?
I am really impressed with Isbell as a songwriter. This song is intended to be jarring, and Isbell sets you up in the first stanza:

I'm a white man living in a white man's world
Under our roof is a baby girl
I thought this world could be hers one day
But her momma knew better

The first two lines make it sound like it'll be a 1-2, 3-4 rhyming scheme by making "world" and "girl" work. (It's the "RL" sound that makes the two words sound similar.)

Then he throws structure out the window. Just when you're thinking Line 4 is going to end with something that rhymes with "one day" he hits you with a bitten off, terse "But her momma knew better." It gets your attention like a two-by-four to your skull. 
for a devastating annihilation of all this crud,
I am not your negro - doc on James Baldwin
 westslope wrote:

Perhaps you should expand on those thoughts.  Note that your perspective at first blush appears to be white-centric.

Taken from point of view of those who suffered white boot-heels on their necks..... and in some cases may still feel disadvantaged, I am not sure.  

 
Agree with you, west.  You have to be deaf not to hear the guilt in the song.  And you have to be blind not to see that it's both warranted and past due.  I'm a white man, I don't have to give everything away and go hang myself, but being conscious of my privilege and the lack of the same privilege for others is the first step in figuring out how to resolve these injustices.  But don't listen to me.  Listen to the song.