The Beatles — While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Album: White Album
Avg rating:
9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3035
Ratings histogram:
Released: 1968
Length: 4:33
Plays (last 30 days): 1
I look at you all
See the love there that's sleeping
While my guitar gently weeps
I look at the floor
And I see it needs sweeping
Still my guitar gently weeps

I don't know why nobody told you
How to unfold your love
I don't know how someone controlled you
They bought and so-old you

I look at the world
And I notice it's turning
While my guitar gently weeps
(With) every mistake
We must surely be learning
Still my guitar gently weeps
Yeah

I don't know how you were diverted
You were perverted too
I don't know how you were inverted
No-one alerted you

I look at you all
See the love there that's sleeping
While my guitar gently weeps
Look at you all
Still my guitar gently wee-ee-eeps

Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh

Oh, oh, oh, oh (eee...)
Oh, oh, oh (... eee)

Oh, oh (eee...)
Oh, oh (... eee...)
Oh, oh (... eee)

Yeah, yeah, yeah (eee...)
Yeah, yeah, yeah (... eee...)
Yeah, yeah, yeah (... eee...)
Go! (... eee)

Oh (eee)
Comments (588)add comment
 DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}
 
Everybody in my hotel room agrees with you, DeemerDave...  hope you are having a blast this nude year...  this song is soooo good for the ears... everybody in my hotel room loves this song...  we be dancing like happy hippies...  love Radio Paradise...

10 - Godlike for me

The Beatles
While My Guitar Gently Weeps


Never have been a fan of the Beatles per se but love some of their music.  This one especially.  Thanks RP - brightened my day!
 expatlar wrote:
Makes me chuckle to see that there are actually 43 people who desire to play the contrarian enough to rate this song a '1'. You don't have to 'love the Beatles' but come on, a 1? What kind of a foul mood do you have to be in to rate this song a 1? :-)

 
Bingo ! A FOOL !? (SORRY,NHM)
Makes me chuckle to see that there are actually 43 people who desire to play the contrarian enough to rate this song a '1'. You don't have to 'love the Beatles' but come on, a 1? What kind of a foul mood do you have to be in to rate this song a 1? :-)
Great song! Love Todd Rundgren's cover: https://youtu.be/935UEiqO95A
Still beautiful!
Perfect song
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y

 
WOW! Spine tingling solo. {#Notworthy} RIP man.
Regarding the Prince solo at the end of "While My Guitar..." at the posthumous induction of George Harrison at the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame, in a New York Times article from April 28, 2016, Craig Inciardi (Curator at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum) says "I’ve seen every induction performance from ’92 to the present, so that’s like 24 shows. On a purely musical level, a technical level as far as musicianship, that performance seems like the most impressive one."

During the rehearsals the night before, Jeff Lynne's guitar player, who was also playing the song, essentially takes the lead ahead of Prince at every opportunity, but places it straight, note for note, as George had done it.  Prince says nothing and just plays rhythm, so no one really gets to hear what's he's going to do.  He later comments to the producer not to worry, during the actual performance, he just says nonchalantly, I'll step in at the end.  So basically no rehearsal.

Tom Ferrone, drummer for Tom Petty, says just before the actual performance: "Tom sort of went over to him (Prince) and said, “Just cut loose and don’t feel sort of inhibited to copy anything that we have, just play your thing, just have a good time.” It was a hell of a guitar solo, and a hell of a show he actually put on for the band. When he fell back into the audience, everybody in the band freaked out, like, “Oh my God, he’s falling off the stage!” And then that whole thing with the guitar going up in the air. I didn’t even see who caught it. I just saw it go up, and I was astonished that it didn’t come back down again. Everybody wonders where that guitar went, and I gotta tell you, I was on the stage, and I wonder where it went, too."
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y

 
And is fully on!  Just the theatrics that go with it,  Backwards off stage in the middle of it all!
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y
 TianGongZhong wrote:

Is this a question or a statement ?
In case of  question; why don´t you google the playlist of the album ?
In case of a statement, what do you want to tell us ?

 

 

 

 

Lighten up Francis 


 Skydog wrote:
this song preceded "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" on this album, right?

 
Is this a question or a statement ?
In case of  question; why don´t you google the playlist of the album ?
In case of a statement, what do you want to tell us ?

 
Pffffffffffff to long this song {#Drunk}
this song preceded "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" on this album, right?
 SquiddlyDiddly wrote:

Deserves a bump because the Purple One HAS TO BE WATCHED on this video with what is (in my book) one of the best solos ever played.

 
No shit!
 Proclivities wrote:
 skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
If you counted three quarters of the population of the United States there would be about 25% who were not counted.
 
5/3 of people are bad at fractions.
 Jannne wrote:

               80% of communication is body language so I don't know what you're all  talking about

 
It's time for Wynona's Big Brown Beaver
 gjr wrote:
i miss beatle george

 
My favorite song by my favorite Beatle...
 Poacher wrote:

Deserves a bump because the Purple One HAS TO BE WATCHED on this video with what is (in my book) one of the best solos ever played.

 
Wow!!
 zepher wrote:
Beatles Best - Thanks George!  Here's an amazing tribute ——>



 
Deserves a bump because the Purple One HAS TO BE WATCHED on this video with what is (in my book) one of the best solos ever played.
 oldsaxon wrote:

The owls are not what they seem.

 
               80% of communication is body language so I don't know what you're all  talking about
 rharvey658 wrote:

skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
Yes, but did you know that some owls aren't that smart?

 
The owls are not what they seem.
 gjr wrote:
i miss beatle george

 
I opened the comments section just to add the very same comment. George Harrison is sorely missed.

And this is is one of the few truly good Beatles songs. John Lennon and George Harrison was easily the two best song writers in the group, in my humble opinion. Mind you, I see Beatles as being overrated in general... But not George Harrison. He's often underrated. But a great musician!
 Padutarb wrote:
A stunning example of the Beatles and special guest playing at their best.
 
I had no idea!  Thanks for posting...
 skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
If you counted three quarters of the population of the United States there would still be about 25% who were not counted.
i miss beatle george
A stunning example of the Beatles and special guest playing at their best.
 treatment_bound wrote:
I thought I'd post this on a song which gets played a lot, and this one seems to fit the bill—
Does anybody know what were the very first songs played here at RP?  I'd love to go back and read some embryonic comments of 13+ years ago.  I only found this station after reading this TIME magazine article from April 2004:
 
>>Bill and Rebecca Goldsmith are making a living from an idea that would probably get you laughed out of business school: running an Internet radio station commercial free. From their home in Paradise, Calif., in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, they operate Radioparadise.coma format-busting station that spins a tasteful mix of music ranging from the Beatles to Norah Jones to the Strokes. Fewer than 5,000 listeners tune in during peak times, but fans like it so much, they sent the couple $120,000 in contributions last year, covering the cost of bandwidth, song royalties and other expenses and leaving enough to support a "comfortable lifestyle," says Bill Goldsmith, who quit a 30-year career in FM radio to run and DJ his homegrown version.

If you can't bear another spin of Britney Spears, you're one of the reasons that stations like Radioparadise are beginning to prosper and investors are again flocking to another alternative to the AM/FM dial: satellite radio. After years of unmet promise, online stations, along with satellite offerings like Sirius and XM Satellite Radio, are building audiences even as regular radio struggles through a decade-long slump (time spent listening is down 14% since 1994, according to the ratings firm Arbitron). Critics say industry consolidation has turned AM/FM stations into McRadio: nationally uniform, repetitive and clogged more than ever with ads and promos. But scores of high-quality alternatives are now competing for your ears (and dollars).

Just a few years ago, online radio heads were mainly tech geeks willing to put up with patchy, low-quality sound. These days about 19 million people listen to online radio at least once a week, up from 7 million in 2000, according to Arbitron. Online listenership is growing at an average 43% a year as more people get broadband connections at home and tune in for content that's unavailable or in short supply on commercial stations, from blues to folk to Al Franken's new liberal Air America network, which is broadcast in just a few markets on the AM/FM dial but was streamed 2 million times in its first week, according to its exclusive webcaster, RealNetworks. "People are fed up with terrestrial radio," says Dave Goldberg, who oversees Yahoo's music site and radio network, Launchcast, which draws 1 million listeners a week.

For now, it's the satellite guys, together claiming around 2 million subscribers, who are drawing Wall Street's attention. Though their stock prices had plummeted over concerns that they might run out of cash, their shares have soared in the past year. XM is up 379%; Sirius, 491%. Analyst April Horace of Janco Partners in Denver predicts that within five years 16 million Americans will be listening to satellite radio. She says the market would explode if a popular shock jock like Howard Stern were to defect with his 15 million listeners, a prospect that looked more likely last week after six traditional stations dropped his show following an FCC proposal to fine their corporate parent, Clear Channel Communications, $495,000 for airing his "indecent" content.

Satellite broadcasters use a pay-radio model, beaming dozens of channels coast to coast commercial free, with original programming such as comedy and kids' shows. Financially backed in part by automakers, the satellite firms charge between $10 and $13 a month, mainly targeting car-radio users. Increasingly, though, listeners are buying portable tuners for their homes. To neutralize a key AM/FM advantage, both satellite broadcasters have started to provide traffic and weather updates in select markets.

So far, digital radio's growth isn't hurting big radio empires such as Clear Channel. With 1,213 stations and roughly a 30% ratings share in markets such as Phoenix, Ariz., and Milwaukee, Wis., Clear Channel had a record 2003: revenues of $8.9 billion and a net income of $1.1 billion. But listeners are clearly spending less time with terrestrial radio. One cause may simply be more media competition, from DVDs to video games to an expanding universe of digital TV. But critics of the radio industry say consolidation is partly to blame too. They claim Clear Channel and other big groups have ruined the airwaves by homogenizing song lists, politicizing the dial with conservative talk and sucking out local flavor with voice-tracking technology, which enables DJs to sound like local talent even if they're a thousand miles away. Clear Channel contends that its cost-cutting measures have saved hundreds of stations from bankruptcy and that it's the programming's popularity, reflected in ratings, that ultimately drives the business.

Nonetheless, teenagers and young adults are increasingly going online to find new music (not just file-sharing networks), particularly alternative content that rarely gets airplay on the commercial FM dial. About 13% of Americans ages 12 to 24 now listen to online radio on a weekly basis, up from 6% of that age group in 2001, according to Edison Media Research/Arbitron. With 185 stations, AOL's radio network, which, like TIME, is part of Time Warner, draws a weekly listenership of 1.5 million (by that measure, Arbitron notes, it's the nation's largest online network). Advertising remains tiny, but that may change. Ronning Lipset, an upstart Internet-radio ad firm in New York City, recently started packaging AOL, Live365.com MSN and Yahoo into a kind of national network, which has a combined audience of at least 250,000 listeners in a quarter hour, the minimum needed to appeal to national-media planners. The firm says the networks will start running audio spots from national advertisers in May.

For now the AM/FM industry doesn't seem too concerned. Arbitron estimates that 228 million Americans ages 12 and up still listen to broadcast radio weekly, and radio remains the top broadcast medium after TV for advertisers who want to reach a mass market. Radio ad sales in Arbitron markets are forecast to rise 5.5% this year, to $14 billion, according to BIA Financial Network, a media consultancy in Chantilly, Va. Yet as more consumers tune to stations like Radioparadise, those numbers could slip. Goldsmith's thoughtful playlists are organized by musical theme, moving from, say, a bluesy Tracy Chapman tune to a Latin-blues Carlos Santana track to a rock-blues number by the Hellecasters. He heeds listener feedback and says the only thing he really cares about is "playing good music," regardless of whether it's a hot single being pitched by a promoter or a classic. That's why his fans are pulling out their wallets to support him.



 

Posted: Mar 08, 2002 - 12:17

 

An interesting worldbeat track. The AMG Artist Info link is kinda funny, though. For Similar/Related albums they list Dave Brubeck, Jackson Browne, Bananarama, and Perry Como, among others. (Maybe they just use a random album generator if they're not sure?) :p

Earlier than Pangea — Kiranga Beat, anyway.



skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
Yes, but did you know that some owls aren't that smart?
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
Thanks for this one this morning👍🎶😁
Never before have I seen a linkage between New Years' Day by U2 and this song. It is a real skill to be able to see the relationships among pieces from different eras and to blend them so effectively. A toast to the proprietor!
 DaidyBoy wrote:
The problem for me is that, although I think it is vain in the extreme to even attempt to make a meaningful comment about this song, I struggle with it a bit.  I love George's music and that is why I feel guilty even saying this, but this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.  Over to you.

 
George even said it himself about this song, that when he first presented it to the band, that they weren't into it.  So he brought in Eric Clapton (which was unheard of back in the day) to spruce it up a bit.
Instant PSD for me :P
 DaidyBoy wrote:
The problem for me is that, although I think it is vain in the extreme to even attempt to make a meaningful comment about this song, I struggle with it a bit.  I love George's music and that is why I feel guilty even saying this, but this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.  Over to you.
 
I think I know what you mean. I always assumed it was something to do with the engineering/production. Like maybe the tape speed was just slightly off, or fluctuating, resulting in that "not quite right" sound. If there are any recording engineers in the audience I'd be interested to hear their opinion. No denying it's a classic song, of course.
 DaidyBoy wrote:
... this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.
 
This piece does "plod," and that's a result of the slowed-down tempo. I have to believe the tempo is 100% purposeful. It's slower than your heart rate with a timing that makes it feel a bit off balance. This tempo gives the whole number a certain lamenting effect. Another reason why I find the tune so amazing.
The problem for me is that, although I think it is vain in the extreme to even attempt to make a meaningful comment about this song, I struggle with it a bit.  I love George's music and that is why I feel guilty even saying this, but this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.  Over to you.
 islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot. 
 islander wrote:

90% of song ratings are crap.

 

True, but only 10% of the time.
Just another phenomenal Beatles track.
{#Heartkiss} GODLIKE + + +
Bliss
 spiggy wrote:
Because we are not all robots or same tastes or age :)

 
personally it's a 9 :) Just be happy it averages North of 9, indicating the vast majority rate highly. 
DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 


 
90% of song ratings are crap.
Certain long stretches of this song -- or at least this recording of this song -- feature a high-pitched quavering beeping in the background, unpleasantly, which I've never noticed before.  Like a cell phone going off in the other room.  But I've turned everything else off, and this is the source.  Weird.
Beatles Best - Thanks George!  Here's an amazing tribute ---->


Because we are not all robots or same tastes or age :)

 
personally it's a 9 :) Just be happy it averages North of 9, indicating the vast majority rate highly. 
DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 

 gjr wrote:



haters gonna hate

 
Good question, Its a perfect 10 for me.
 DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 


haters gonna hate