Name My Band - oldviolin - May 25, 2018 - 11:44am
 
how do you feel right now? - SeriousLee - May 25, 2018 - 11:44am
 
Freedom of speech? - R_P - May 25, 2018 - 11:30am
 
That's a terrible idea. Let's do it! - DownHomeGirl - May 25, 2018 - 11:26am
 
What Did You Do Today? - SeriousLee - May 25, 2018 - 11:09am
 
Baseball, anyone? - SeriousLee - May 25, 2018 - 11:03am
 
deleting/editing comments function gone - sirdroseph - May 25, 2018 - 10:51am
 
Counting with Pictures - SeriousLee - May 25, 2018 - 10:49am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Chwkbud - May 25, 2018 - 10:48am
 
Trump - VV - May 25, 2018 - 10:42am
 
What Makes You Laugh? - DownHomeGirl - May 25, 2018 - 10:03am
 
North Korea - cc_rider - May 25, 2018 - 9:17am
 
Nature's Creatures - Proclivities - May 25, 2018 - 9:14am
 
Way Cool Video - Coaxial - May 25, 2018 - 8:41am
 
Memorial Day - cc_rider - May 25, 2018 - 8:14am
 
songs that ROCK! - sirdroseph - May 25, 2018 - 2:23am
 
Would you drive this car for dating with ur girl? - haresfur - May 24, 2018 - 10:17pm
 
Strips, cartoons, illustrations - haresfur - May 24, 2018 - 9:23pm
 
Crazy conspiracy theories - haresfur - May 24, 2018 - 9:22pm
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - AliGator - May 24, 2018 - 9:06pm
 
Race in America - R_P - May 24, 2018 - 6:33pm
 
Live Music - kurtster - May 24, 2018 - 6:30pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - May 24, 2018 - 4:13pm
 
Things that piss me off - Antigone - May 24, 2018 - 2:59pm
 
New Music - ptooey - May 24, 2018 - 2:02pm
 
Art Show - oldviolin - May 24, 2018 - 1:16pm
 
Animal Resistance - Proclivities - May 24, 2018 - 1:10pm
 
Military Matters - R_P - May 24, 2018 - 1:03pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - k_trout - May 24, 2018 - 12:21pm
 
Annoying stuff. not things that piss you off, just annoyi... - sirdroseph - May 24, 2018 - 11:37am
 
Cryptic Posts - Leave Them Guessing - SeriousLee - May 24, 2018 - 11:17am
 
Afghanistan - R_P - May 24, 2018 - 10:28am
 
Photos you haven't taken of yourself - Antigone - May 24, 2018 - 10:19am
 
Books read recently - islander - May 24, 2018 - 9:48am
 
illegal immigrants - meower - May 24, 2018 - 7:16am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - kurtster - May 24, 2018 - 5:45am
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - May 23, 2018 - 6:51pm
 
The Truth Unfolds - Red_Dragon - May 23, 2018 - 6:15pm
 
Breaking News - R_P - May 23, 2018 - 10:49am
 
Celebrity Deaths - GeneP59 - May 23, 2018 - 9:16am
 
Celebrity Face Recognition - Proclivities - May 23, 2018 - 6:56am
 
Environmental, Brilliance or Stupidity - miamizsun - May 23, 2018 - 5:04am
 
World Music - R_P - May 23, 2018 - 12:34am
 
Latin Music - R_P - May 23, 2018 - 12:24am
 
The Obituary Page - ScottN - May 22, 2018 - 8:54pm
 
BACK TO THE 80's - R_P - May 22, 2018 - 7:16pm
 
Guns - kcar - May 22, 2018 - 7:12pm
 
TV shows you watch - kcar - May 22, 2018 - 6:12pm
 
How To Be Politically Correct, A Primer - R_P - May 22, 2018 - 4:09pm
 
oh boy CAKE! - haresfur - May 22, 2018 - 2:49pm
 
what about those emo kids? - Proclivities - May 22, 2018 - 11:27am
 
What makes you smile? - Steely_D - May 22, 2018 - 10:56am
 
When are you too old to drive? - meower - May 22, 2018 - 10:27am
 
Back to the 00's - rhahl - May 22, 2018 - 10:21am
 
XPRIZE & Singularity University - miamizsun - May 22, 2018 - 4:12am
 
Milk squirting in Turkey??? - miamizsun - May 22, 2018 - 4:06am
 
Your Current Crush - Alexandra - May 21, 2018 - 11:12pm
 
Immigration - haresfur - May 21, 2018 - 11:11pm
 
Ridiculous or Funny Spam - R_P - May 21, 2018 - 10:50pm
 
Those Silly FBI Guys! - ScottFromWyoming - May 21, 2018 - 10:21pm
 
"Everybody Must Get Stoned" actually not about drugs - Manbird - May 21, 2018 - 8:44pm
 
International Year of Rumi - 2007 - oldviolin - May 21, 2018 - 6:30pm
 
Evolution! - R_P - May 21, 2018 - 6:07pm
 
Fake News*  ?  ! - R_P - May 21, 2018 - 5:34pm
 
Coffee - Manbird - May 21, 2018 - 5:33pm
 
The Great Divide: Retro vs. Metro America - Manbird - May 21, 2018 - 5:28pm
 
Toodledo and/or OpenID - Manbird - May 21, 2018 - 5:18pm
 
Fun For Fingers - Manbird - May 21, 2018 - 5:12pm
 
• • • Lost and Found • • •  - Manbird - May 21, 2018 - 5:09pm
 
PANTS ON FIRE! - miamizsun - May 21, 2018 - 3:53pm
 
The Dragons' Roost - haresfur - May 21, 2018 - 2:36pm
 
Bad Poetry - oldviolin - May 21, 2018 - 8:46am
 
What are you reading now? - rhahl - May 21, 2018 - 7:12am
 
What are you listening to now? - SeriousLee - May 21, 2018 - 6:32am
 
Classical Music - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 9:01pm
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » HALF A WORLD Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 56, 57, 58  Next
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SeriousLee

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Posted: Nov 26, 2017 - 1:02pm


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Posted: Nov 23, 2017 - 9:13am


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Posted: Nov 21, 2017 - 7:53am


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Posted: Nov 20, 2017 - 8:19am


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Posted: Nov 14, 2017 - 9:03am


Hamlet:
To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to: 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there's the rub:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause—there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
Th'oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of th'unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovere'd country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry
And lose the name of action.

Hamlet Act 3, scene 1, 55–87
To be, or not to be

Probably the best-known lines in English literature, Hamlet's greatest soliloquy is the source of more than a dozen everyday (or everymonth) expressions—the stuff that newspaper editorials and florid speeches are made on. Rather than address every one of these gems, I've selected a few of the richer ones for comment. But rest assured that you can quote any line and people will recognize your erudition.

Hamlet, in contemplating the nature of action, characteristically waxes existential, and it is this quality—the sense that here we have Shakespeare's own ideas on the meaning of life and death—that has made the speech so quotable. Whether or not Shakespeare endorsed Hamlet's sentiments, he rose to the occasion with a very great speech on the very great topic of human "being."

The subtle twists and turns of the prince's language I shall leave to the critics. My focus will be on the isolated images Hamlet invokes, the forgotten pictures behind the words, the parts we ignore when we quote the sum.

TO BE, OR NOT TO BE, THAT IS THE QUESTION

If you follow Hamlet's speech carefully, you'll notice that his notions of "being" and "not being" are rather complex. He doesn't simply ask whether life or death is preferable; it's hard to clearly distinguish the two—"being" comes to look a lot like "not being," and vice versa. To be, in Hamlet's eyes, is a passive state, to "suffer" outrageous fortune's blows, while not being is the action of opposing those blows. Living is, in effect, a kind of slow death, a submission to fortune's power. On the other hand, death is initiated by a life of action, rushing armed against a sea of troubles—a pretty hopeless project, if you think about it.

TO SLEEP, PERCHANCE TO DREAM

Hamlet tries to take comfort in the idea that death is really "no more" than a kind of sleep, with the advantage of one's never having to get up in the morning. This is a "consummation"—a completion or perfection—"devoutly to be wish'd," or piously prayed for. What disturbs Hamlet, however, is that if death is a kind of sleep, then it might entail its own dreams, which would become a new life—these dreams are the hereafter, and the hereafter is a frightening unknown. Hamlet's hesitation is akin to that of the condemned hero Claudio in Measure for Measure, written a few years after Hamlet. "Ay, but to die," he considers, "and go we know not where;/ To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot . . ." (Act 3, scene 1). Hamlet's fear is less clearly visualized, but is of the same type. No matter how miserable life is, both heroes suppose, people prefer it to death because there's always a chance that the life after death will be worse.

THERE'S THE RUB

We say "there's the rub" and think we communicate perfectly well—but do we? I mean "there's the catch" while you might think "there's the essence"—the meanings can be close, yet they're not identical. Shakespeare implies both senses, but calls up a concrete picture which would have been familiar to his audience. "Rub" is the sportsman's name for an obstacle which, in the game of bowls, diverts a ball from its true course. The Bard was obviously fond of the sport (he played on lawns, not lanes): he uses bowling analogies frequently and expertly. This is the most famous of such analogies, though not as elaborate as "Like to a bowl upon a subtle ground,/ I have tumbled past the throw" (Coriolanus, Act 5, scene 2). Although "rub" is used figuratively here, the image that leaps to Hamlet's mind is vivid and homely. Hamlet is often homely at odd moments, especially when the topic is death. "I'll lug the guts into the neighbor room" is another good example.

THIS MORTAL COIL

Shakespeare is really twisting syntax with this one. "Coil" generally means a "fuss" or a "to-do"—as in the line, "for the wedding being here to-morrow, there is a great coil tonight" (Much Ado about Nothing, Act 3, scene 3). But a to-do can't be "mortal," so what Hamlet must mean is "this tumultuous world of mortals."

HIS QUIETUS MAKE WITH A BARE BODKIN

This phrase succinctly illustrates the power Shakespeare can achieve by employing words with radically different origins and uses. "Quietus" is Latinate and legalistic; "bodkin" is concrete and probably Celtic in origin. Here, "his quietus make" means something like "even the balance" or "settle his accounts for good." That he might do this with a "bodkin"—elsewhere in Shakespeare a kind of knitting-needle, here a dagger—puts more menace in the abstract, almost clinical "quietus." "Fardels," "grunt," and "sweat" pick up on the grunting and sweating sound of "bodkin." "Fardel," a pack or bundle, is derived from the Arabic fardah (package): "grunt" and "sweat" are rooted in good old Anglo-Saxon. Hamlet's "fardels" are the wearying burdens of a weary life.

THE UNDISCOVERED COUNTRY, FROM WHOSE BOURN NO TRAVELLER RETURNS

Comfortably back in the high diction appropriate to a noble soliloquizer, Hamlet pulls out all the stops. He may be likening the unimaginable "something after death" to the New World, from which, in this Age of Exploration, some travelers were returning and some weren't. "Bourn" literally means "limit" or "boundary"; to cross the border into the country of death, he says, is an irreversible act. But Hamlet forgets that he has had a personal conversation with one traveler who has returned—his father, whose ghost has disclosed the details of his own murder <see THERE ARE MORE THINGS IN HEAVEN AND EARTH, HORATIO>.

THUS CONSCIENCE DOES MAKE COWARDS OF US ALL Hamlet's phrase is certainly the most famous judgment on fear of the unknown. But he was not the first of Shakespeare's characters to utter such words: King Richard III, on the verge of his downfall, had said that "Conscience is but a word that cowards use,/ Devis'd at first to keep the strong in awe" (Richard III, Act 5, scene 3). The difference is that Machiavellian Richard professes not to believe in (or even have) a conscience, though his bad dreams ought to have convinced him otherwise. Hamlet believes in conscience; he just questions whether it's always appropriate
Proclivities
“If you can't control your peanut butter, you can't expect to control your life.
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Posted: Nov 13, 2017 - 1:11pm

halloween 60s
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Posted: Nov 2, 2017 - 1:15pm

!
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Posted: Oct 31, 2017 - 9:02am


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Posted: Oct 30, 2017 - 10:09am


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Posted: Oct 29, 2017 - 12:12pm


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Posted: Oct 27, 2017 - 9:19am


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Posted: Oct 26, 2017 - 7:42am

 Proclivities wrote:
cherry coke

 
oh, my
Proclivities
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Posted: Oct 26, 2017 - 7:40am

cherry coke
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Posted: Oct 26, 2017 - 7:07am


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Posted: Oct 13, 2017 - 9:03pm


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Posted: Oct 8, 2017 - 5:34pm


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Posted: Sep 21, 2017 - 11:28pm


Proclivities
“If you can't control your peanut butter, you can't expect to control your life.
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Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aries
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Sep 21, 2017 - 10:01am

 sirdroseph wrote:
 Proclivities wrote:
the gargoyle

What show was that?? lol
 
It was a made-for-TV movie called "Gargoyles", from the early 1970s, about a "scientist" discovering a tribe of gargoyles hiding out in the desert.  I haven't seen it in years but it was scary when I was ten or eleven years old.  It's funny that the credits show him as "The Gargoyle", when there was more than one gargoyle in the movie - he was more or less "the leader", and the only gargoyle who spoke IIRC.  It would be interesting if there were a sitcom or other TV show back then that had a gargoyle character.  Maybe they could have introduced him as a recurring character on "Chico & The Man" or "The Bob Newhart Show".
RIP Bernie Casey.
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Posted: Sep 21, 2017 - 9:54am

 Proclivities wrote:
the gargoyle

 




What show was that?? lol
Proclivities
“If you can't control your peanut butter, you can't expect to control your life.
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Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aries
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Sep 21, 2017 - 8:11am

the gargoyle
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