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Testing your Metal? - Proclivities - Jul 13, 2018 - 10:36am
 
Advertising Gone Mad - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 12, 2018 - 5:22pm
 
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TWO WORDS - oldviolin - Jul 11, 2018 - 9:13am
 
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USA! USA! USA! - Proclivities - Jul 10, 2018 - 6:33am
 
Russia - R_P - Jul 9, 2018 - 9:34pm
 
Latin Music - R_P - Jul 9, 2018 - 5:05pm
 
Word Association - oldviolin - Jul 9, 2018 - 1:48pm
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Little known information...maybe even facts Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 41, 42, 43  Next
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Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 15, 2018 - 7:56am

 aflanigan wrote:

You must be from my nape of the woods.

When we shopped at Finast, I used to try and sneak onto the conveyor belt next to our groceries, so I could help load them into the car.

 
NY Metro area - Yonkers mostly.  That's where that Finast was; it eventually became a Grand Union and they removed the conveyor system.
sdwright

sdwright Avatar

Location: underwater
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 4:27pm

Lemme COCOkrispy MeSelf a'lil tea  Nesquik

Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 1:29pm
Reply >

 islander wrote:

Eventually, the brand becomes the thing, like klenex, or jacuzzi



  
Well, not exactly. You're talking about a registered trademark being legally deemed generic, and therefor unenforceable. See e.g.

Nestle Co., Inc. v. Chester's Market, Inc., 571 F. Supp. 763 (D. Conn. 1983)*

 I don't think the word "tea" was ever trademarked in any country. It could not have been registered in the US because words that are already generic/descriptive are denied registration.

What you're talking about is food labeling, which would probably fall under the jurisdiction of either USDA or FDA (like what can be labeled "organic"). Typically, the FDA or USDA probably would not have an issue unless a trade group representing producers of tea plant derived products raised a stink with the regulatory agency, like with "butter" vs. "oleo" or "margerine", "cheese" vs. "cheese food product", etc.

*Full disclosure: one of the defendants in Nestle v. Chester's Market was the grocery store in my home town. Stan and Rose Chester were good friends with my dad, who worked for First National Grocery ("Finast"), a regional grocery chain.
sdwright
Sink or Swim
sdwright Avatar

Location: underwater
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Taurus
Chinese Yr: Snake


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 9:33amReply | Edit | Delete >

Or the verb like Googling, FaceBooking



sdwright

sdwright Avatar

Location: underwater
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 4:21pm

But thanks for calling me a Fineassstttt {#Exclaim}

aflanigan wrote:

You must be from my nape of the woods.

When we shopped at Finast, I used to try and sneak onto the conveyor belt next to our groceries, so I could help load them into the car.

 


sdwright

sdwright Avatar

Location: underwater
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 4:13pm

I had to swat a skeeter on my nape in that grocery store!
 

aflanigan wrote:

You must be from my nape of the woods.

When we shopped at Finast, I used to try and sneak onto the conveyor belt next to our groceries, so I could help load them into the car.

 


aflanigan

aflanigan Avatar

Location: At Sea
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 2:42pm

 Proclivities wrote:

I think it's more often the USDA.  A lot of recipes call for things like "coconut butter" or "soy butter" both of which are obviously margarine (or non-dairy spread") - they cannot be sold as "butter".  USDA does also classify what can be called "cheese": I believe it can only be made from an animal's milk and cannot contain coagulated vegetable oils.  I believe "cheese product" contains milk and oil, and "cheese food" contains no milk at all.  It's been a while since I've worked in the food industry, so I may have mixed up those last two.
 I remember Finast stores, there were a few of them around where I grew up.  One that we went to had a system where they put you name on the grocery bags and put them on a conveyor system (belts and wheels) and the customer would drive around the side (under a covered loading area) where they would help you load up your car. You didn't have to put the grocery bags back in the cart and roll it outside.

 
You must be from my nape of the woods.

When we shopped at Finast, I used to try and sneak onto the conveyor belt next to our groceries, so I could help load them into the car.
Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 1:52pm

 aflanigan wrote:
 I don't think the word "tea" was ever trademarked in any country. It could not have been registered in the US because words that are already generic/descriptive are denied registration.

What you're talking about is food labeling, which would probably fall under the jurisdiction of either USDA or FDA (like what can be labeled "organic"). Typically, the FDA or USDA probably would not have an issue unless a trade group representing producers of tea plant derived products raised a stink with the regulatory agency, like with "butter" vs. "oleo" or "margerine", "cheese" vs. "cheese food product", etc.

*Full disclosure: one of the defendants in Nestle v. Chester's Market was the grocery store in my home town. Stan and Rose Chester were good friends with my dad, who worked for First National Grocery ("Finast"), a regional grocery chain.
 
I think it's more often the USDA.  A lot of recipes call for things like "coconut butter" or "soy butter" both of which are obviously margarine (or non-dairy spread") - they cannot be sold as "butter".  USDA does also classify what can be called "cheese": I believe it can only be made from an animal's milk and cannot contain coagulated vegetable oils.  I believe "cheese product" contains milk and oil, and "cheese food" contains no milk at all.  It's been a while since I've worked in the food industry, so I may have mixed up those last two.
 I remember Finast stores, there were a few of them around where I grew up.  One that we went to had a system where they put you name on the grocery bags and put them on a conveyor system (belts and wheels) and the customer would drive around the side (under a covered loading area) where they would help you load up your car. You didn't have to put the grocery bags back in the cart and roll it outside.


aflanigan

aflanigan Avatar

Location: At Sea
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 1:29pm

 islander wrote:

Eventually, the brand becomes the thing, like klenex, or jacuzzi



 
Well, not exactly. You're talking about a registered trademark being legally deemed generic, and therefor unenforceable. See e.g.

Nestle Co., Inc. v. Chester's Market, Inc., 571 F. Supp. 763 (D. Conn. 1983)*

 I don't think the word "tea" was ever trademarked in any country. It could not have been registered in the US because words that are already generic/descriptive are denied registration.

What you're talking about is food labeling, which would probably fall under the jurisdiction of either USDA or FDA (like what can be labeled "organic"). Typically, the FDA or USDA probably would not have an issue unless a trade group representing producers of tea plant derived products raised a stink with the regulatory agency, like with "butter" vs. "oleo" or "margerine", "cheese" vs. "cheese food product", etc.

*Full disclosure: one of the defendants in Nestle v. Chester's Market was the grocery store in my home town. Stan and Rose Chester were good friends with my dad, who worked for First National Grocery ("Finast"), a regional grocery chain.
sdwright

sdwright Avatar

Location: underwater
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 9:33am

Or the verb like Googling, FaceBooking

islander wrote:

Eventually, the brand becomes the thing, like klenex, or jacuzzi



 


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 14, 2018 - 9:02am

i'm the reigning kimchi eating champ at my house

mauling the competition since whenever


spammer

spammer Avatar

Location: Bokey's Basement(he doesn't feed us)


Posted: Jan 16, 2018 - 9:52pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
A friend of mine is in China, where he's learned that when ordering pizza, if it sounds like they're saying "taco pizza," and you're thinking "hooray for tacos and pizza," you will soon be eating an octopus pizza.

 
Not unless tied down and force fed.{#Sick}
ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 16, 2018 - 9:24pm

A friend of mine is in China, where he's learned that when ordering pizza, if it sounds like they're saying "taco pizza," and you're thinking "hooray for tacos and pizza," you will soon be eating an octopus pizza.
Edit: "Tako" is Japanese for octopus.
islander

islander Avatar

Location: Seattle
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 9:51am

 haresfur wrote:

I hate it when someone offers you tea and then gives you a choice of herb shit and no tea

 
Settle down, here have a nice cup of cucumber lime chai -


ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 9:47am

 haresfur wrote:

Herb Shit & No Tea

 
Jazz band name.
Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 9:46am

 haresfur wrote:

I hate it when someone offers you tea and then gives you a choice of herb shit and no tea

 
{#Lol}  Especially if it's a choice between chamomile and mint.
haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 9:22am

 islander wrote:

2 words

Number of words that most of earth has for “tea,” the other being “chai.” Talk to essentially any human and say those two words and they’ll catch your meaning. The universal nature of those two words is partially due to how they spread; land trade routes exported the word “chai” and sea trade exported the word “tea” and their derivatives.



 
So you are saying that 2 different factions in China couldn't agree on what to call the stuff
cc_rider

cc_rider Avatar

Location: Bastrop
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 9:09am

 islander wrote:

2 words

Number of words that most of earth has for “tea,” the other being “chai.” Talk to essentially any human and say those two words and they’ll catch your meaning. The universal nature of those two words is partially due to how they spread; land trade routes exported the word “chai” and sea trade exported the word “tea” and their derivatives.

 
Interesting...

From our local organic gardening radio show, we found out you can make tea from dried yaupon holly leaves. Apparently it's quite good, and contains caffeine - the only plant in North America with caffeine? Yaupon runs rampant here, it's more pest than anything. Next time I trim ours, I'll give it a try and report back.
c.
haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 9:03am

 Proclivities wrote:

Also, to a lot of sticklers in the tea industry, especially outside of the US, unless it actually contains tea (camellia sinensis) it's considered an "infusion" or "herbal infusion".  Anything steeped in boiling water can apparently be called "tea" in The States.

 
I hate it when someone offers you tea and then gives you a choice of herb shit and no tea
islander

islander Avatar

Location: Seattle
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 8:22am

 Proclivities wrote:

Also, to a lot of sticklers in the tea industry, especially outside of the US, unless it actually contains tea (camellia sinensis) it's considered an "infusion" or "herbal infusion".  Anything steeped in boiling water can apparently be called "tea" in The States.

 
Eventually, the brand becomes the thing, like klenex, or jacuzzi


Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 7:40am

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

And yet, chai has morphed into this (delicious) concoction that's sometimes no tea at all.

 
Also, to a lot of sticklers in the tea industry, especially outside of the US, unless it actually contains tea (camellia sinensis) it's considered an "infusion" or "herbal infusion".  Anything steeped in boiling water can apparently be called "tea" in The States.
ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 12, 2018 - 7:20am

 islander wrote:

2 words

Number of words that most of earth has for “tea,” the other being “chai.” Talk to essentially any human and say those two words and they’ll catch your meaning. The universal nature of those two words is partially due to how they spread; land trade routes exported the word “chai” and sea trade exported the word “tea” and their derivatives.



 
And yet, chai has morphed into this (delicious) concoction that's sometimes no tea at all.
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