Kenny Burrell — Chitlins Con Carne
Album: Midnight Blue
Avg rating:
7.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 609
Ratings histogram:
Released: 1963
Length: 5:18
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Instrumental)
Comments (66)add comment
Image result for slow groove gif
Damn... this guys good!
 calypsus_1 wrote: Niice, thanks for posting. In the 70's he came out to Western Canada to play. We also hosted Joe Pass, Barney Kessel, John Abercrombie, Lennie Breau, Gene Bertoncini... They all did master classes for guitarists and everyone was asked "Who's the greatest?" They all said "Lennie Breau". Including Lenny :)
Kennyb
Jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell, at 80 - Photo Credit: Katie Falkenberg
November 5, 2011 

Longtime Angeleno Kenny Burrell, who turned 80 this summer, has been recording as a jazz guitarist for six decades; he’s long been one of the masters of the instrument and is now one of the last links to jazz’s heroic age.

He speaks in an Arts & Books profile about his roots in Detroit, the meaning of the blues, his birthday concert at UCLA’s Royce Hall, his years at the university and his hopes for the future.

Burrell was shaped by hearing a number of important guitarists – the blazingly innovative Charlie Christian, the lush, chordal Oscar Moore – while very young, but also by the blues scene in his hometown and elsewhere; he often heard T-Bone Walker and John Lee Hooker while growing up.

But somehow, he says, “I was not influenced very much by guitar players.” His other main inspirations – “Parker, Miles, Lester Young” – were all horn players, and Burrell often plays a single-line, horn-like

He discusses his philosophy of music in the profile, his dedication to balancing head and heart and his reputation for disciplined improvisations. “When I first became aware of music and began listening to recordings, everything was three, four, five minutes – max. And I learned, great artists can say a lot in that time. I’ve got through a lot of generations of music. But I come from a generation for which performaces were not overly long.”
 
His latest album, “Tenderly,” is a concert for solo guitar recorded in Pasadena’s Boston Court. It includes standards like “Autumn Leaves,” a medley of songs associated with Billie Holiday, and a montage by Burrell’s hero, Duke Ellington. This is reflective, lyrical music, a long way from the soulful ‘60s Burrell of “Chitlins Con Carne,” but powerful in its own way.
And even today, 60 years after he began recording with Dizzy Gillespie, music remains mysterious to Burrell. “It goes into that part of us that’s the spirit. That’s what will speak to people really loud. That’s a combination of knowledge and feeling. And there’s a deeper thing that we don’t understand – that pulls our own knowledge and feelings together. If you’re lucky you can express that.”

— Scott Timberg / latimes



 


Mmmm. Ya. Whole album is awesome. Worth getting.
You got to keep the devil way down in the hole...
Thank God for jazz.  Without it the PSD button might never have been invented.
laiiiiiid back
very nice 
Nice to hear the original (?) version of this.  Stevie Ray Vaughan has a kick ass version, which I am familiar with.

THANK YOU for playing great jazz like this... Hope more like to come!!! ...from 1963's Midnight Blue :)


It don't get no cooler.
i always heard that for good fortune for the incoming year to eat chitlins on New Years Day
 OHMish wrote:

Tell me what chitlins are

 
The small intestines of a pig, which are popular in the Southern U.S.; usually either boiled or stewed (as in this song title).  In Britain they're called "chitterlings" and they're called "tricandilles" in France.  I have never eaten them, nor do I have any intention of ever doing so.
 sirdroseph wrote:
Wonder how many here know what Chitlins are.{#Chef}BTW, I ain't eatin em

 
Same thing they're calling sweet breads here I think - offal no?
 
 sirdroseph wrote:
Wonder how many here know what Chitlins are.{#Chef}BTW, I ain't eatin em

 
Tell me what chitlins are
Wonder how many here know what Chitlins are.{#Chef}BTW, I ain't eatin em
Like this.

A lot.
Amazing.
If I was this cool, I'd never put my saxaphone down!

 
 Businessgypsy wrote:
 Stingray wrote:

OK - here's the chance to trash me:

I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER BORING!

 A successful troll, Mr. S! Lots of response. I won't trash you, any life so incredibly exciting and purposeful that this music doesn't effect an elevation of the senses above the daily levels is admirable.

 
Wow...beautifully put, Businessgypsy! Disagreeing with a compliment that may or may not be a putdown! {#Clap}

Myself, however: I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER INTERESTING! 
I spotted it a 9 rating 6 months ago but it is so so Godlike, followed by strong Coldplay then, holy shit man ELP!!! "from the Beginning"
wow, cool man 
{#Music} A hard 8, possibly even a 9.
Wow..bumping from a 7 -> 8.  Sweet.
annoying to the highest degree
Kennyb
Jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell, at 80 - Photo Credit: Katie Falkenberg
November 5, 2011 

Longtime Angeleno Kenny Burrell, who turned 80 this summer, has been recording as a jazz guitarist for six decades; he’s long been one of the masters of the instrument and is now one of the last links to jazz’s heroic age.

He speaks in an Arts & Books profile about his roots in Detroit, the meaning of the blues, his birthday concert at UCLA’s Royce Hall, his years at the university and his hopes for the future.

Burrell was shaped by hearing a number of important guitarists – the blazingly innovative Charlie Christian, the lush, chordal Oscar Moore – while very young, but also by the blues scene in his hometown and elsewhere; he often heard T-Bone Walker and John Lee Hooker while growing up.

But somehow, he says, “I was not influenced very much by guitar players.” His other main inspirations – “Parker, Miles, Lester Young” – were all horn players, and Burrell often plays a single-line, horn-like

He discusses his philosophy of music in the profile, his dedication to balancing head and heart and his reputation for disciplined improvisations. “When I first became aware of music and began listening to recordings, everything was three, four, five minutes – max. And I learned, great artists can say a lot in that time. I’ve got through a lot of generations of music. But I come from a generation for which performaces were not overly long.”
 
His latest album, “Tenderly,” is a concert for solo guitar recorded in Pasadena’s Boston Court. It includes standards like “Autumn Leaves,” a medley of songs associated with Billie Holiday, and a montage by Burrell’s hero, Duke Ellington. This is reflective, lyrical music, a long way from the soulful ‘60s Burrell of “Chitlins Con Carne,” but powerful in its own way.
And even today, 60 years after he began recording with Dizzy Gillespie, music remains mysterious to Burrell. “It goes into that part of us that’s the spirit. That’s what will speak to people really loud. That’s a combination of knowledge and feeling. And there’s a deeper thing that we don’t understand – that pulls our own knowledge and feelings together. If you’re lucky you can express that.”

— Scott Timberg / latimes



As others said, this is awesome on so many levels. Never heard him before, I need to check him out - what I love about the station at it's best, an effortless way to find new music.
 hayduke2 wrote:
Burrell is awesome, this piece could run for hours and I'd be both blessed out and stompin' around the room, it's that cool

 
I don't recall ever hearing this.  It's an awesome fit for current state of mind.  Early afternoon on a Friday, Perhaps I should have waited a bit on the 22oz of hearty Cappuccino Stout.  Working remote, so couldn't resist starting Friday a wee bit early :P  What a perfect mix for my current state of mind on a moody Pacific Northcoast day.  Tune seemed to end all too soon almost leaving me wishing for an extended version. 

Mr Burrell is yet another name added to my ever growing list of artists to give another listen. A huge thanks Bill to opening my ears to so much great music!

Salut!
Burrell is awesome, this piece could run for hours and I'd be both blissed out and stompin' around the room, it's that cool
 Stingray wrote:

OK - here's the chance to trash me:

I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER BORING!

 A successful troll, Mr. S! Lots of response. I won't trash you, any life so incredibly exciting and purposeful that this music doesn't effect an elevation of the senses above the daily levels is admirable.
 Stingray wrote:

OK - here's the chance to trash me:

I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER BORING!

 
It's not everybody's style. I get that, NP.

Although the musicians on this set are playing free-form, it's not exactly a license to just play as you want. There's a tightness to the extended solos that break out as each musician takes their turn. That's the beauty of really great jazz (and this is more "cool" than "bebop"). 
51 years old and the quality of this recording is so much better than most of today's recordings. Sad, really.
 Stingray wrote:

OK - here's the chance to trash me:

I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER BORING! 


Finally, some evidence that you're listening to something/someone besides yourself. This is encouraging.
I'm Shocked!  I would have bet any amount that this was a Stevie Ray Vaughn original.  Nice version.
Very cool! Timeless. Don't think ever heard this before - nor do I know the name. So learned something great today! 
Sucker for the blues.  Sucker for jazz.  Combined, they slay me.
Great tune!   Thanks RP. 
Wow! Why can't all music be this good!
One of the top jazz guitarists.
 Stingray wrote:

OK - here's the chance to trash me:

I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER BORING!

 
You are hereby trashed.

OK - here's the chance to trash me:

I FIND THIS MUSIC RATHER BORING!


 stevetheshoe wrote:
Being from Detroit I used to get to see Kenny when he came to town to visit his relatives and he would play a night or two at Baker's Keyboard Lounge. This album is on my desert island list, have it on vinyl and cd.
 
Baker's was a great club! I didn't get there often, but caught George Benson and Les McCann there on separate occasions.
I don't care how much music you listen to today, you will not hear a song with a cooler name than "Chitlins Con Carne."
Being from Detroit I used to get to see Kenny when he came to town to visit his relatives and he would play a night or two at Baker's Keyboard Lounge. This album is on my desert island list, have it on vinyl and cd.
WOW. Had only heard SRV version. Thanks again, Bill.
1963, eh?  And Mr. Burrell is still alive?  Proof that old people can be cool people.
Love this!
Nice!
I have this great LP!
 DigitalJer wrote:
smooooth
 
Loooooooooooooooooooooong