Jefferson Airplane — Plastic Fantastic Lover
Album: Surrealistic Pillow
Avg rating:
7.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 320









Released: 1967
Length: 2:33
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Her neon mouth with the blinkers-off smile
Nothing but an electric sign
You could say she has an individual style
She's part of a colorful time

Secrecy of lady-chrome-covered clothes
You wear cause you have no other
But I suppose no one knows
You're my plastic fantastic lover

Her rattlin' cough never shuts off
Is nothin' but a used machine
Her aluminum finish, slightly diminished
Is the best I ever have seen

Cosmetic baby plugged into me
I'd never ever find another
I realize no one's wise
To my plastic fantastic lover

The electrical dust is starting to rust
Her trapezoid thermometer taste
All the red tape is mechanical rape
Of the TV program waste

Data control and IBM
Science is mankind's brother
But all I see is drainin' me
On my plastic fantastic lover
Comments (48)add comment
Groooooovy man groovy
 lowelltr wrote:
Hate this hippie crap...
 

 
Chained to a chair and repeated loops of Incense and Peppermints Born to Be Wild for you., 
Marty telling it like it is! Jorma!
...to be followed by Radiohead's "Fake Plastic Trees"?
 Typesbad wrote:

That is interesting because probably 80 - 90% of what you listen to on RP was inspired and/or influenced by this "hippie crap".

 
No kidding!!!
 lowelltr wrote:
Hate this hippie crap...
 

 
That is interesting because probably 80 - 90% of what you listen to on RP was inspired and/or influenced by this "hippie crap".
Boom Boom Yeah OHHH yeah HmmmHmmm HMMMM! Awwwwww!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
{#Music}
Well I remember how I turned my best friend Kevin onto this around 1983 or so...blew his frickin' mind, man! And I think it STILL rocks!
Man, remember back in the day when LP's were either mono or stereo and you had to check to be sure which you were buying? Many were produced in mono because record players back then came with a single speaker built in. Stereo equipment at home was cutting edge technology at the time. Many thanks to Rick Turner, Ron Wickersham and the late Owsley Stanley for developing the concert stage equipment to blow out our ears all those years ago. My tinnitus is the price I paid.
 lowelltr wrote:
Hate this hippie crap...
 

 
I guess you had to be there . Sorry you missed it.
So cool, I just listened to Surrealistic Pillow in its entirety and no sooner did it finish playing than I bring up RP to hear Plastic Fantastic Lover. If you were a fan from back in the day, perhaps familiar with San Francisco you might enjoy these:

http://jormakaukonen.com/cracksinthefinish/?p=5343

http://coffee.caffetrieste.com/in-memoriam-paul-kantner-1941-2016

Hate this hippie crap...
 
 Great story!  Your Mom bought you two of my most favorite albums.
   Isabeau wrote:
I turned 10 in 1967. My Mom had grown desperately sick of my Monkee records. She turned to me before my 10th bday party and said with a nearly pleading look on her face, "Honey, wouldn't you like to have some new music to play for your party?"  I looked at her as if she had three heads. She sighed, shook her head and said, "Well, let me see what we can do."
A few days later, carrying a large, white paper bag. With a big smile she said "The man at the record store said these were good for parties."

I pulled out the albums "The Doors: The Doors" and "Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillow." Two of the most acid rock albums in music history.

At the tender age of 10, I went from "Last Train to Clarksville" to  "White Rabbit." I clearly remember her expression when I asked her, "What's a 'Backdoor man?"

In the succeeding 47 years, My Mother has never, ever purchased music for me again. 

 


Great to hear this blast from the past again!  It's been a long time. 
 Isabeau wrote:
I turned 10 in 1967. My Mom had grown desperately sick of my Monkee records. She turned to me before my 10th bday party and said with a nearly pleading look on her face, "Honey, wouldn't you like to have some new music to play for your party?"  I looked at her as if she had three heads. She sighed, shook her head and said, "Well, let me see what we can do."
A few days later, carrying a large, white paper bag. With a big smile she said "The man at the record store said these were good for parties."

I pulled out the albums "The Doors: The Doors" and "Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillow." Two of the most acid rock albums in music history.

At the tender age of 10, I went from "Last Train to Clarksville" to  "White Rabbit." I clearly remember her expression when I asked her, "What's a 'Backdoor man?"

In the succeeding 47 years, My Mother has never, ever purchased music for me again. 

 
{#Roflol} {#Clap} {#Dancingbanana_2}

Out-fuckin'-standing story! Did your ma listen to the Oedipal bit of "The End"? That alone might have flipped her lid. You'd think that the title "Surrealistic Pillow" might have flashed a warning light in her head. Did anyone at the party say anything? 

Those 60s: full of epiphanies, reversals and pratfalls...

Hey, the Monkees rocked in their own bubblegum way but I can sympathize with your mom. Kids that age lock into a song or movie and the groove in their heads doesn't easily wear out.

I wonder if she ever went back to the record store and gave that guy a piece of her mind... 
Awesome. Incredible. Historic...
joelbb; You have missed out The better version of this song (IMHO) was on the Bless It's Pointed Little head album. Also, check out Bathing at Baxters, and Crown of Creation. P.S. One of the best live shows I have witnessed. 
Bumped from 8 to 9

What was I thinking? 
 Isabeau wrote:
I turned 10 in 1967. My Mom had grown desperately sick of my Monkee records. She turned to me before my 10th bday party and said with a nearly pleading look on her face, "Honey, wouldn't you like to have some new music to play for your party?"  I looked at her as if she had three heads. She sighed, shook her head and said, "Well, let me see what we can do."
A few days later, carrying a large, white paper bag. With a big smile she said "The man at the record store said these were good for parties."

I pulled out the albums "The Doors: The Doors" and "Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillow." Two of the most acid rock albums in music history.

At the tender age of 10, I went from "Last Train to Clarksville" to  "White Rabbit." I clearly remember her expression when I asked her, "What's a 'Backdoor man?"



In the succeeding 47 years, My Mother has never, ever purchased music for me again. 

 
I would have loved to see your mom's face when you asked her that!