The Clash — This is Radio Clash
Album: The Essential Clash
Avg rating:
6.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 840









Released: 1981
Length: 4:07
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Interrupting all programmes

This is radio clash from pirate satellite

Orbiting your living room,
Cashing in the bill of rights
Cuban army surplus or refusing all third lights
This is radio clash on pirate satellite

This sound does not subscribe
To the international plan
In the psycho shadow of the white right hand
Then that see ghettology as an urban Vietnam
Giving deadly exhibitions of murder by napalm

This is radio clash tearing up the seven veils
This is radio clash please save us, not the whales
This is radio clash underneath a mushroom cloud
This is radio clash
You don't need that funeral shroud

Forces have been looting
My humanity
Curfews have been curbing
The end of liberty

Hands of law have sorted through
My identity
But now this sound is brave
And wants to be free - anyway to be free

This is radio clash on pirate satellite
This is not free Europe
Noh an armed force network
This is radio clash using audio ammunition
This is radio clash can we get that world to listen?
This is radio clash using aural ammunition
This is radio clash can we get that world to listen?
This is radio clash on pirate satellite
Orbiting your living room,
Cashing in the bill of rights
This is radio clash on pirate satellite
This is radio clash everybody hold on tight

A-riggy diggy dig dang dang

Go back to urban 'nam
Comments (165)add comment
Yeah, maybe one of the only 10 tracks of the whole eighties which really haven't survived modernity, perhaps due to the feeble production (never could get used to the sound of that saturated mike at the very end).
Far from their best songs.
First Thievery Corporation and now the Clash?  Why are there so many people that only want to listen to classic rock?  They probably think Mozart sucks too.  Ick.
Wow! Private satelite radio was so futuristic back then.
it's a very weak song ....and too long !
This was released in 1981. . . in case Bill wants to update the info.  It was a single and not released on any studio albums. 

what a pity
Gotta say...I don't think this is a very good song. The effects are jarring and unnecessary.
 zimm wrote:
hate hate hate the clash.....
 

WHAT??
hate hate hate the clash.....
too early man.  too early.
 CamLwalk wrote:
I thought this is Radio Paradise.  Make up your mind!
 
Bill should jump in and say Paradise, every time the singer says Clash. {#Roflol}....OK maybe not....

 SinisterDexter wrote:
*Unmute*

Is it over yet?... Damn, not yet.

*Mute*
 
Haha... and it's such a long song, too.

Luckily, my 10 is still there.

 raga wrote:
log in just to check if my 1 was still there...

 


log in just to check if my 1 was still there...

Oh, this is just too perfect.
*Unmute*

Is it over yet?... Damn, not yet.

*Mute*
 haljordan wrote:
Interesting, I hear a bass line that the Gorillaz borrowed.  I wonder if this is the source or if the Clash borrowed it from somewhere else too.
 
Maybe because Mick Jones & Paul Simonon (from the Clash) played on the current Gorillaz album and are a part of the current  tour?

Gorrilaz and the Clash

Interesting, I hear a bass line that the Gorillaz borrowed.  I wonder if this is the source or if the Clash borrowed it from somewhere else too.
 Xeric wrote:
Meh.  The Clash, for me, is like the Pixies.  That is, they're okay, I guess, or only periodically irritating, but still . . . what the hell is all the fuss about, you know?
 
Wrong tense - you should be asking what the hell was all the fuss about? To which the answers might be that the Clash were a pioneering rock band coming out of punk, strongly politically-committed and active, bitingly satirical, musically-innovative, who stuck two fingers up to the record companies and did their own thing. They were very much part of the zeitgeist, and some might say that they defined it. The 80s were sh1te for pop music, but the alternative scene thrived and The Clash were a major part of that, influencing a whole heap of other bands. Of course, the danger with songs like this (and, say, Guns of Brixton), whose lyrics contain many contemporary references, are that they'll not age well, but many of their songs (Rock the Casbah, Magnificent Seven come to mind) do still have relevance and 'rockability' even today.

Not that I was ever a big fan of the Clash, as though some songs are in my all-time top 10 much of their output was a bit 'ho-hum' IMO (I bought Sandinista! and was bored stiff by it), but they were probably as important to the 80s as The Beatles were to the 60s. IMHO naturally ;)