Elliott Smith — Waltz #2
Album: XO
Avg rating:
7.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2555









Released: 1998
Length: 4:34
Plays (last 30 days): 1
First the mic, then a half cigarette
Singing "Cathy's Clown"
That's the man that she's married to now
That's the girl that he takes around town
She appears composed, so she is, I suppose
Who can really tell?
She shows no emotion at all
Stares into space like a dead china doll
I'm never going to know you now
But I'm going to love you anyhow

Now she's done and they're calling someone
Such a familiar name
I'm so glad that my memory's remote
Because I'm doing just fine hour to hour, note to note
Here it is, the revenge to the tune
"You're no good,
You're no good, you're no good, you're no good"
Can't you tell that it's well understood?

I'm never going to know you now
But I'm gonna love you anyhow

I'm here today and expected to stay on and on and on
I'm tired
I'm tired

Looking out on the substitute scene
Still going strong
XO, Mom
It's ok, it's all right, nothing's wrong
Tell Mr. Man with impossible plans to just leave me alone
In the place where I make no mistakes
In the place where I have what it takes

I'm never going to know you now
But I'm going to love you anyhow
I'm never going to know you now
But I'm going to love you anyhow
I'm never going to know you now
But I'm going to love you anyhow
Comments (350)add comment
 Stuff_n_Nonsense wrote:
After a quick glance at the more recent comments, I wonder if people are more into Elliott Smith as a tragic figure than an artist.  I know I used to be when I first started listening to him, but I feel confident in saying that he was extraordinarily expressive for a pop musician.  His life difficulties no doubt informed his expression enormously, but his ability to bring out human emotion in music was unique.  From what I understand, he worked very hard at what he did.  He wrote his accompaniment first, and then, from those chord progressions, chiseled his melodies free as if from stone, creating songs that organically emerged from his harmonies.  He also played with our ears, able to make a song written in a major key sound like it was written in minor.  Talk about expressive.  He was able to take a sound that is strongly associated with happiness, joy, and triumph in our culture, and then turn it into something that sounded sad, anxious, and dark, as though it were in a minor key.  No small feat.  He then added lyrics that aptly complimented the emotions already presented perfectly in his music.  He deeply thought about what he was doing and, it seems, went at it with a strong eye for purpose and deliberation.  The man was a true artist, working in a medium he loved.  Despite his many sad songs, I often experience joy when listening to him because I find his work so beautiful.  Just wonderful stuff, in my thinking anyway.      



steeler wrote:


One of the best song comments I have read.  Thanks.

 
beautifully put.
Thank you both.
played much too often ...
Love this song.  And as I write this comment, it ends and Bill masterfully segues to Sam Phillips’ Five Colors.  Life is good when listening to RP!
Still lovely.
Can you play Waltz #1?
 CaptainConnector wrote:
Pity about the production quality. 

 
The production quality sounds fine to me; I guess it could've been more "professional" sounding if that were what he wanted.
very nice!
Too much "Fine-fine-fine" {#Arghhh}
 DJ_BellsEye wrote:
More Elliott Smith, please.

{#Clap}

 
I have some sad news for you then...
Pity about the production quality. 
More Elliott Smith, please.

{#Clap}
reminds me of Badly Drawn Boy.
 steeler wrote:


One of the best song comments I have read.  Thanks.

  Agree


 steeler wrote:


One of the best song comments I have read.  Thanks.

 
Agree
Can't stop humming along! {#Good-vibes}
 Stuff_n_Nonsense wrote:
After a quick glance at the more recent comments, I wonder if people are more into Elliott Smith as a tragic figure than an artist.  I know I used to be when I first started listening to him, but I feel confident in saying that he was extraordinarily expressive for a pop musician.  His life difficulties no doubt informed his expression enormously, but his ability to bring out human emotion in music was unique.  From what I understand, he worked very hard at what he did.  He wrote his accompaniment first, and then, from those chord progressions, chiseled his melodies free as if from stone, creating songs that organically emerged from his harmonies.  He also played with our ears, able to make a song written in a major key sound like it was written in minor.  Talk about expressive.  He was able to take a sound that is strongly associated with happiness, joy, and triumph in our culture, and then turn it into something that sounded sad, anxious, and dark, as though it were in a minor key.  No small feat.  He then added lyrics that aptly complimented the emotions already presented perfectly in his music.  He deeply thought about what he was doing and, it seems, went at it with a strong eye for purpose and deliberation.  The man was a true artist, working in a medium he loved.  Despite his many sad songs, I often experience joy when listening to him because I find his work so beautiful.  Just wonderful stuff, in my thinking anyway.       

 

One of the best song comments I have read.  Thanks.
Gone to soon.  Melancholy songs that bring a smile.  Thats not easily done.
 more-more-more wrote:
To me, voice and style is very close to Badly Drawn Boy.

 
Totally - only heard this for the first time a month or so on BBC 6Music radio. Maybe BDB got his inspiration from here..
 Stuff_n_Nonsense wrote:
After a quick glance at the more recent comments, I wonder if people are more into Elliott Smith as a tragic figure than an artist.  I know I used to be when I first started listening to him, but I feel confident in saying that he was extraordinarily expressive for a pop musician.  His life difficulties no doubt informed his expression enormously, but his ability to bring out human emotion in music was unique.  From what I understand, he worked very hard at what he did.  He wrote his accompaniment first, and then, from those chord progressions, chiseled his melodies free as if from stone, creating songs that organically emerged from his harmonies.  He also played with our ears, able to make a song written in a major key sound like it was written in minor.  Talk about expressive.  He was able to take a sound that is strongly associated with happiness, joy, and triumph in our culture, and then turn it into something that sounded sad, anxious, and dark, as though it were in a minor key.  No small feat.  He then added lyrics that aptly complimented the emotions already presented perfectly in his music.  He deeply thought about what he was doing and, it seems, went at it with a strong eye for purpose and deliberation.  The man was a true artist, working in a medium he loved.  Despite his many sad songs, I often experience joy when listening to him because I find his work so beautiful.  Just wonderful stuff, in my thinking anyway.       

 
Very well said, kudos for sharing your very interesting insights.  I watched Good Will Hunting with my (grown) kids a few weeks ago and some of his soundtrack tunes were so compellingly emotional and appropriate for the complexities of the characters that I was a little awestruck.

I have just read the comments with interest, I don't know the body of his songs, but on first hearing, the beginning of this song evinced an "oh no, not another Dylan wannabe", then it was wait a minute, that just could be Sonny and Cher.

Nah, it's better than that.