Derek and the Dominos — I Looked Away
Album: Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs
Avg rating:
7.4

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Total ratings: 465
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Released: 1971
Length: 3:02
Plays (last 30 days): 1
She took my hand
And tried to make me understand
That she would always be there,
But I looked away
And she ran away from me today;
I'm such a lonely man.

It came as no surprise to me
That she'd leave me in misery.
It seemed like only yesterday
She made a vow that she'd never walk away.

And if it seemed a sin
To love another man's woman, baby,
I guess I'll keep on sinning
Loving her, Lord, till my very last day.

But I looked away
And she ran away from me today;
I'm such a lonely man.
Comments (56)add comment
 Antigone wrote:

Thank you for this info. Such an amazing album.


 
i think it's pretty much common knowledge that duane allman carried this album. esp slide, arrangements and esp vocals. quite easy to pick out who is playing by style. then you can hear for yourself. 
Bill:
I'm surprised "Drug Fueled Brilliance" is not a book title or band name!

Z
 idiot_wind wrote:
Just play the entire album. 

 
...I know, right? Bell Bottom Blues is next!  Like others have said, this is one of those perfect albums, heck I think BillG has got most of it in his library (ok, more like most of the original songs.)

And so true what BillG said....Eric could have just started his rehab facility right there and then! 

Long Live RP!


Just play the entire album. 
timeless classic and still stands up ! rip duane
in my Top 10 songs ever. Stunning. 
 Decoy wrote:
this guy has some potential. reminds me of an early Clapton.

 
Yeah me too, strange that {#Ask}
For an album that is 45 years old (oh my god!) it still sounds amazingly fresh.

Must have something to do with "luck".

Ha!  
all songs from this album = automatic 10
Played this lovelorn album over, and over, and over again sophomore year...following a break-up (caused by my stupidity).
this guy has some potential. reminds me of an early Clapton.
This album is EPIC and will always be timeless!! I still play the thing back to back every month or two..same for Eat A Peach (Allman Bros).

Cheers and thanks Bill & Rebecca! 
bobby whitlock!!!
 Proclivities wrote:


I think Papernapkin was referring to Clapton's "Rivers of Blood/Enoch Powell" proclamations, not his substance-abuse issues.



 
If EC was a racist I doubt he could get the many outstanding black touring musicians who have been with him over the years, like Nathan East or Steve Jordan, to tag along...even for the money.  People get caught up in issues of national or ethnic identity, it takes a lot of hard work to process the social changes that result from large scale immigration, given the less flattering dimensions of human nature (taken on average--there's always a minority who demonstrate more spiritual responses).

 Papernapkin wrote:
A boring song. Eric is such a bad human being. It's tainted my perception of his music.

 
Oddly, I always think of D&D as a garage band.  But I love this whole album.
 As to the other, EC has been sober for years.  He is, at least, trying to be a better human being.
Ahhhhh!!!!

The guitars!

The freaking guitars!
 
 bitbanger wrote:
What a great album. Duane Allman's slide work was just so exceptional.

 
Amen to that
I have this album in my collection of Vinyls, absolutly one of my favorits, including the cover art I agree!!
What a great album. Duane Allman's slide work was just so exceptional.
 Wmeower wrote:
This is one of the best albums ever recorded.
 
Well.... certainly Mr. Clapton's best.
 Papernapkin wrote:
A boring song. Eric is such a bad human being. It's tainted my perception of his music.
 
What???
Top 10 rock songs ever
 Shesdifferent wrote:
Fond memories of this song......
 

Yeah, I know what you mean...  this song is good for the ears, and the era...

 
Fond memories of this song......
Jeeeeeeze - I had forgotten how powerful this song is.
 Papernapkin wrote:
A boring song. Eric is such a bad human being. It's tainted my perception of his music.
 

 pcicatar wrote:

Sorry to hear you say that...  You must also dismiss Chuck Berry, James Brown, Jerry Lee Lewis, Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, David Bowie, Miles Davis, Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, David Crosby, Willie Nelson, Iggy Pop, Chet Baker, Vic Chesnutt, Jimi Hendrix, Michael Jackson, Keith Moon, Gram Parsons, Ike Turner and dozens of others who've made less than stellar choices for themselves and others.  Granted, I'll never make the mistakes they have but I'll also never dismiss their contributions to the world.

 

I think Papernapkin was referring to Clapton's "Rivers of Blood/Enoch Powell" proclamations, not his substance-abuse issues.


Clapton's music was so much better when he was a junkie...
 Papernapkin wrote:
A boring song. Eric is such a bad human being. It's tainted my perception of his music.
 
Sorry to hear you say that...  You must also dismiss Chuck Berry, James Brown, Jerry Lee Lewis, Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, David Bowie, Miles Davis, Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, David Crosby, Willie Nelson, Iggy Pop, Chet Baker, Vic Chesnutt, Jimi Hendrix, Michael Jackson, Keith Moon, Gram Parsons, Ike Turner and dozens of others who've made less than stellar choices for themselves and others.  Granted, I'll never make the mistakes they have but I'll also never dismiss their contributions to the world.

A boring song. Eric is such a bad human being. It's tainted my perception of his music.
 a_genuine_find wrote:

Indeed.

Wiki

When Clapton heard from Dowd that the Allman Brothers Band were due to play in Miami on August 26, 1970, he insisted on going to see their show, saying, "You mean that guy who plays on the back of (Wilson Pickett's) Hey Jude? You know him? .. We have to go." He was allowed to sit at the front of the stage, and made his way out while Duane had his eyes closed, playing a solo. When Duane opened his eyes and saw Clapton, he froze. Dickey Betts, the Allmans' other lead guitarist, assumed Duane had broken a string and decided to take up where Duane left off. When he saw Clapton, he turned his back, presumably to keep from freezing himself.

After the show, Duane asked if he could come by the studio to watch some recording sessions, but Clapton refused: "Bring your guitar; you got to play!" The two returned to the studio and formed a deep bond overnight; Dowd reported that they "were trading licks, they were swapping guitars, they were talking shop and information and having a ball – no holds barred, just admiration for each other's technique and facility."<4>

Although the original concept was that "I was just going to play on one or two", Duane said, he wound up contributing to almost all the tracks on Layla, even the ones on which work had already started – and lifting everyone's work onto a higher plane. "He brought out the best in all of us", said Whitlock.



 
Thank you for this info. Such an amazing album.



I always forget that Bobby Whitlock had such a big voice. Nice to hear it again.
I love this album, but I think this is one of the weaker cuts,  Just mho ~ {#Think}
Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you................. {#Clap}
What a special album.  Always loved it.
 calypsus_1 wrote:

 

amazing group!;  in album "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" (1970) -   ** 8  / 9 **

remembering mr. Howard Duane Allman and Mr. Carl Dean Radle.


 
Indeed.

Wiki

When Clapton heard from Dowd that the Allman Brothers Band were due to play in Miami on August 26, 1970, he insisted on going to see their show, saying, "You mean that guy who plays on the back of (Wilson Pickett's) Hey Jude? You know him? .. We have to go." He was allowed to sit at the front of the stage, and made his way out while Duane had his eyes closed, playing a solo. When Duane opened his eyes and saw Clapton, he froze. Dickey Betts, the Allmans' other lead guitarist, assumed Duane had broken a string and decided to take up where Duane left off. When he saw Clapton, he turned his back, presumably to keep from freezing himself.

After the show, Duane asked if he could come by the studio to watch some recording sessions, but Clapton refused: "Bring your guitar; you got to play!" The two returned to the studio and formed a deep bond overnight; Dowd reported that they "were trading licks, they were swapping guitars, they were talking shop and information and having a ball – no holds barred, just admiration for each other's technique and facility."<4>

Although the original concept was that "I was just going to play on one or two", Duane said, he wound up contributing to almost all the tracks on Layla, even the ones on which work had already started – and lifting everyone's work onto a higher plane. "He brought out the best in all of us", said Whitlock.



WTF... I actually LIKE a Clapton song!  WOW!  That's cool.  {#Angel}
 babygirl614 wrote:
Speaking of platters, my 5-yr-old saw me take out a record and said "Mommy, that's a big CD!"
 
{#Lol}

 bam23 wrote:
I have always enjoyed this album and can recall buying it when the expense was a real challenge. However, as much as I appreciate the totality of the pieces and the album, this sort of "super group" collection is surely a thing of the past. And maybe that's the way it should be. The whole world of rock music had a freshness that cannot exist again. I think the whole music world was more alive to new possibilities in the late 60s and into the very early 70s. Fact is, there was quite a load of dreck produced then, as now. In many ways, musicians today may be more technically proficient, across the board. However, everyone has heard everything since that time. Layla was once new and fresh, if that can be imagined today.
    I am constantly amused and a little annoyed by the frequent complaints that a riff or piece of melody has been stolen from another performer. This makes little sense, partly because we are awash in an aural sea, in which, partly thanks to such options as Radio Paradise, everything that has been recorded within the past 50+ years is available. Not only available, but hard to escape. Deliberately or not, it's all fusion now. The music worms into the brain, sets up shop, and infects the thoughts that we think are our own.
 
Wow. Which punchbowl did you drink from? Are you gonna sleep on Owsley's porch? 

 

amazing group!;  in album "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" (1970) -   ** 8  / 9 **

remembering Mr. Howard Duane Allman and Mr. Carl Dean Radle.




I have always enjoyed this album and can recall buying it when the expense was a real challenge. However, as much as I appreciate the totality of the pieces and the album, this sort of "super group" collection is surely a thing of the past. And maybe that's the way it should be. The whole world of rock music had a freshness that cannot exist again. I think the whole music world was more alive to new possibilities in the late 60s and into the very early 70s. Fact is, there was quite a load of dreck produced then, as now. In many ways, musicians today may be more technically proficient, across the board. However, everyone has heard everything since that time. Layla was once new and fresh, if that can be imagined today.
    I am constantly amused and a little annoyed by the frequent complaints that a riff or piece of melody has been stolen from another performer. This makes little sense, partly because we are awash in an aural sea, in which, partly thanks to such options as Radio Paradise, everything that has been recorded within the past 50+ years is available. Not only available, but hard to escape. Deliberately or not, it's all fusion now. The music worms into the brain, sets up shop, and infects the thoughts that we think are our own.
Timeless classic, could only be a 10! Absolutely superb!
CCinSB wrote:
she took my hand....and tried to make me understand that she would always be there.....
but i looked away.... and she ran away from me today... I'm such a lonely man
she took my hand....and tried to make me understand that she would always be there.....
pope183 wrote:
there's something strange about the drums on this esp the snare - out of phase - hurts me ears a little. something strange about the mix - some kind of phasey-ness pushing somethings out to the sides.
There's a little something strange about the drummer as well.
This is one of the best albums ever recorded.
freeone1 wrote:
Great song, but does this fire anyone else up for some "Bell Bottom Blues"? :cowboy:
Absolutely! As a matter of fact, I wished he'd just go ahead and play the whole album!!!
there's something strange about the drums on this esp the snare - out of phase - hurts me ears a little. something strange about the mix - some kind of phasey-ness pushing somethings out to the sides.
WordMariner wrote:
I true classic from a truly classic platter...... well, yes, the original WAS platter....a vinyl platter....do they still make those?
They do, but mostly as items for djs to spin at clubs. Speaking of platters, my 5-yr-old saw me take out a record and said "Mommy, that's a big CD!" This is excellent, great vocals, never heard it before RP. Keep it up Bill!
Great song, but does this fire anyone else up for some "Bell Bottom Blues"? :cowboy:
Shesdifferent wrote:
Excellent...thanks for not playing LAYLA!!!!!! Love this...
Agree whole heartedly. Layla is over played (under statement !) There are some great tracks on this album, and this is one of them.